UNG receives $10K to use for scholarships

Sawnee Electric Membership Foundation (EMC) awarded the University of North Georgia (UNG) $10,000 for student scholarships.

The scholarships will be used to help high-achieving students who are not currently receiving HOPE Scholarships pay for college.

Last year, UNG awarded five scholarships of $2,000 each, which aided veterans enrolled at the Cumming Campus.

The mission of the Sawnee EMC is to assist in strengthening the communities served by Sawnee EMC by providing financial assistance to selected charitable organizations through the Foundation’s Operation Round Up program. These funds, along with monies from other organizations, allow donations to students, schools and various organizations located in parts of Cherokee, Dawson, Forsyth, Fulton, Gwinnett, Hall, and Lumpkin counties.

UNG’s Cumming Campus opened in August 2012 with more than 500 students. The campus now serves nearly 1,000 students, offers basic core curriculum and general education courses, as well as master’s degrees in business administration and teaching.

‘Precision Education’ Hopes to Apply Big Data to Lift Diverse Student …

Precision Institute at National University Launched to Transform …

The private, nonprofit National University is supporting a four-year, $20-million Precision Education RD effort to develop a learning platform integrating advanced technologies to help higher education institutions adapt to the individual needs of diverse student populations

San Diego, Calif. – Aiming to address some of the most challenging issues confronting higher education today, National University, which serves more than 28,000 primarily-adult learners on campuses and online, is launching today the Precision Institute at National University. The Institute will lead a four-year, $20 million initiative, called Precision Education, that is piloting new approaches to personalize higher education through advanced technologies that adapt to individual student needs and interests with the intent of better serving a diverse student population to college completion. To achieve this goal, the Institute will advance current and future partnerships in coordination with faculty; leading global experts; educational organizations; and education technology partners such as Gooru, Civitas Learning, and Pragya Systems.

The Precision Institute at National University builds on efforts already underway through the Precision Education initiative to identify technology-powered learning approaches that can be leveraged to increase and accelerate student academic success and career development. The Institute will lead research and testing in advanced technologies, open education resources, and predictive analytics with the aim of developing a unique inter-connected and dynamic learning platform. The comprehensive Precision Education initiative has been shaped by National University President Dr. David W. Andrews, with the support of the board of trustees; faculty involved in initiative projects; and the National University System, which is a network of university and education-related affiliates, anchored by National University, dedicated to exceptional student experience to lifelong learners.

“We are entering a new era of opportunity and innovation in higher education with the development of advanced technologies and data analytics tools that can better aid us in creating adaptive learning platforms on a very precise and individual level,” said National University President Dr. David Andrews. “The Precision Institute at National University will contribute to ongoing research in this field as we foster a culture of collaboration with other institutions and organizations that share our mission to better adapt to the unique needs of diverse student learners so that they can more effectively reach their academic and career goals.”

The approaches being explored by the private, nonprofit National University and its Institute are commonly referred to as personalized education or personalized learning, terms that refer to educational approaches that adapt to students’ needs. The Precision Education initiative at National University, led through the Institute, is exploring eight areas related to personalized learning: first-course screening assessments; competency-based learning; adaptive machine learning instruction; micro-badging; online student goal setting;  advisor and adjunct matching; student navigation dashboards and data integrity. The intent is to integrate these approaches, and possibly others, into a uniquely-comprehensive and streamlined personalized education platform. Another distinct feature is the integration of career support services and goal setting throughout the platform.

The next phase of research and development includes integrating Precision Education approaches into 20 general education courses. This process will start in Fall 2017 and proceed through Spring 2018. In addition to research, the Precision Institute at National University, will also support faculty and visiting fellowships, and will host a regular lecture series featuring prominent researchers and experts who are offering innovative approaches toward higher education and learning. The first lecturer, who is speaking at the formal July 19 event to mark the launch of the Precision Institute at National University, is Luciano Floridi, a professor of philosophy and ethics of information at the University of Oxford.

National University is uniquely positioned to house the Precision Institute since it builds on a tradition of offering innovative approaches to higher education, having been created more than 45 years ago to serve the needs of adult and diverse learners through personalized approaches such as evening classes, convenient campus locations, a “one class per month format” and as one of the early pioneers of online education. The Precision Education initiative and Institute also align with the goals of the National University System to emphasize approaches that encourage a “High Tech, High Touch and High Choice” approach to delivering an exceptional student experience through market-relevant programs, superior services, and meaningful learning.

About National University
Founded in 1971, National University is among the largest, private, nonprofit universities in California. With more than 150,000 alumni, National University is the flagship institution of the National University System. National University is dedicated to making lifelong learning opportunities accessible, challenging, and relevant to a diverse population of students. Four schools and two colleges – the College of Letters and Sciences; the Sanford College of Education; the School of Business and Management; the School of Engineering and Computing; the School of Health and Human Services; and the School of Professional Studies – offer more than 100 graduate and undergraduate degrees and 23 teacher credentials. Programs are offered at locations throughout California and across the nation, and are also available online. National University is headquartered in La Jolla, California. http://www.nu.edu/

About the National University System
The National University System is a network of accredited nonprofit education institutions serving higher education and K-12 students that includes National University, John F. Kennedy University, City University of Seattle, and the Division of Pre-College Programs. Established in 2001 to meet the emerging challenges and demands of education in the 21st Century, the network’s complementary universities offer pathways for students to attain professional and terminal degrees through quality and innovative programs delivered in a format that is flexible to the needs of adult learners. The anchor institution, National University, was founded in in 1971 and is among the largest private, nonprofit institutions of higher education in California with more than 150,000 alumni. For more information on the National University System: https://www.nusystem.org/

Precision Institute at National University Launched to Transform Higher Education Through Personalized Learning …

The private, nonprofit National University is supporting a four-year, $20-million Precision Education RD effort to develop a learning platform integrating advanced technologies to help higher education institutions adapt to the individual needs of diverse student populations

San Diego, Calif. – Aiming to address some of the most challenging issues confronting higher education today, National University, which serves more than 28,000 primarily-adult learners on campuses and online, is launching today the Precision Institute at National University. The Institute will lead a four-year, $20 million initiative, called Precision Education, that is piloting new approaches to personalize higher education through advanced technologies that adapt to individual student needs and interests with the intent of better serving a diverse student population to college completion. To achieve this goal, the Institute will advance current and future partnerships in coordination with faculty; leading global experts; educational organizations; and education technology partners such as Gooru, Civitas Learning, and Pragya Systems.

The Precision Institute at National University builds on efforts already underway through the Precision Education initiative to identify technology-powered learning approaches that can be leveraged to increase and accelerate student academic success and career development. The Institute will lead research and testing in advanced technologies, open education resources, and predictive analytics with the aim of developing a unique inter-connected and dynamic learning platform. The comprehensive Precision Education initiative has been shaped by National University President Dr. David W. Andrews, with the support of the board of trustees; faculty involved in initiative projects; and the National University System, which is a network of university and education-related affiliates, anchored by National University, dedicated to exceptional student experience to lifelong learners.

“We are entering a new era of opportunity and innovation in higher education with the development of advanced technologies and data analytics tools that can better aid us in creating adaptive learning platforms on a very precise and individual level,” said National University President Dr. David Andrews. “The Precision Institute at National University will contribute to ongoing research in this field as we foster a culture of collaboration with other institutions and organizations that share our mission to better adapt to the unique needs of diverse student learners so that they can more effectively reach their academic and career goals.”

The approaches being explored by the private, nonprofit National University and its Institute are commonly referred to as personalized education or personalized learning, terms that refer to educational approaches that adapt to students’ needs. The Precision Education initiative at National University, led through the Institute, is exploring eight areas related to personalized learning: first-course screening assessments; competency-based learning; adaptive machine learning instruction; micro-badging; online student goal setting;  advisor and adjunct matching; student navigation dashboards and data integrity. The intent is to integrate these approaches, and possibly others, into a uniquely-comprehensive and streamlined personalized education platform. Another distinct feature is the integration of career support services and goal setting throughout the platform.

The next phase of research and development includes integrating Precision Education approaches into 20 general education courses. This process will start in Fall 2017 and proceed through Spring 2018. In addition to research, the Precision Institute at National University, will also support faculty and visiting fellowships, and will host a regular lecture series featuring prominent researchers and experts who are offering innovative approaches toward higher education and learning. The first lecturer, who is speaking at the formal July 19 event to mark the launch of the Precision Institute at National University, is Luciano Floridi, a professor of philosophy and ethics of information at the University of Oxford.

National University is uniquely positioned to house the Precision Institute since it builds on a tradition of offering innovative approaches to higher education, having been created more than 45 years ago to serve the needs of adult and diverse learners through personalized approaches such as evening classes, convenient campus locations, a “one class per month format” and as one of the early pioneers of online education. The Precision Education initiative and Institute also align with the goals of the National University System to emphasize approaches that encourage a “High Tech, High Touch and High Choice” approach to delivering an exceptional student experience through market-relevant programs, superior services, and meaningful learning.

About National University
Founded in 1971, National University is among the largest, private, nonprofit universities in California. With more than 150,000 alumni, National University is the flagship institution of the National University System. National University is dedicated to making lifelong learning opportunities accessible, challenging, and relevant to a diverse population of students. Four schools and two colleges – the College of Letters and Sciences; the Sanford College of Education; the School of Business and Management; the School of Engineering and Computing; the School of Health and Human Services; and the School of Professional Studies – offer more than 100 graduate and undergraduate degrees and 23 teacher credentials. Programs are offered at locations throughout California and across the nation, and are also available online. National University is headquartered in La Jolla, California. http://www.nu.edu/

About the National University System
The National University System is a network of accredited nonprofit education institutions serving higher education and K-12 students that includes National University, John F. Kennedy University, City University of Seattle, and the Division of Pre-College Programs. Established in 2001 to meet the emerging challenges and demands of education in the 21st Century, the network’s complementary universities offer pathways for students to attain professional and terminal degrees through quality and innovative programs delivered in a format that is flexible to the needs of adult learners. The anchor institution, National University, was founded in in 1971 and is among the largest private, nonprofit institutions of higher education in California with more than 150,000 alumni. For more information on the National University System: https://www.nusystem.org/

New Mexico General Education Assessment Reports

In compliance with SB 161 passed by the New Mexico Legislature, Eastern New Mexico University regularly assesses student learning outcomes in general education courses. The Assessment Committee has created a five-year rotation to assure that all general education courses that are part of the statewide transferable core are regularly assessed, the results reported to the Higher Education Department and to our constituencies, and the results used by programs to enhance student learning.


For More Information

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Associate Professor of Music and Coordinator of Student Learning
Phone: 575.562.2374

National University announces personalized education initiative – The San Diego Union

National University has announced a new initiative that includes more online learning, fewer classroom sessions and personalized education plans tailored for individuals.

“It creates a university that is adaptive to the needs of its students,” National University President David Andrews said about Precision Institute, which officially launches today.

“With most universities, the more selective you are, the more likely you are to ask students to thrive in the setting you’re offering,” Andrews said. “Our students are so diverse that we need to adopt to the needs of the individual students. If you’re not learning one way, we’ll teach it another way.”

The new institute will lead a four-year, $20 million initiative called Precision Education that will be integrated in about 20 general education classes by spring 2018.

gary.warth@sduniontribune.com

Twitter: @GaryWarthUT

760-529-4939

Art, engineering faculty and students learn from each other in ‘making’ course

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — This spring six Penn State faculty members piloted a general education course titled “Making for the Masses,” the first of an expected new generation of courses designed to engage students in new ways on emerging topics such as 3-D printing and maker culture.

The six faculty members are Teaching and Learning with Technology (TLT) Faculty Fellows (three each from the College of Arts and Architecture and the College of Engineering). They collaborated on creating the course, designed to give students an interdisciplinary, cross-functional mindset focused on “maker culture,” a movement based on designing and creating useful objects. Lectures and hands-on activities such as pouring concrete, pottery making, and 3-D printing were among the multiple modes of information delivery that helped students gain practical understanding of the differences in how artists and engineers approach their work.

In one class session, three distinct spaces were set up in a School of Visual Arts classroom for students to design and build a keychain gimbal, a tool for navigation and orientation. Students did traditional physical prototyping for the gimbal in one station using cardboard, Styrofoam, and Xacto knives. In another station, they designed the tool with 3-D printing pens. At the third station, they used a 3-D printer to create a gimbal from their designs. They were able to examine pre-printed gimbals to learn how different printing parameters could affect the finished product. 

“This course resembles a choose-your-own adventure book, where students can pick from a large library of labs that require students to gets hands-on with making in some way. This approach is unique not only from a labs perspective, but that the course is taught by a large group of multi-disciplinary faculty, and also designed to fit into a general education curriculum,” said Bart Pursel, assistant director of TLT.

Faculty found the appeal for engineering students was the opportunity to move beyond lectures and get back to what in many cases drew them to engineering — taking things apart and putting them back together. For visual art students, it was the opportunity to learn about applied science and how it can be incorporated into the creative process.

“When you bring students from different disciplines together in a hands-on maker environment, you open up new educational possibilities,” said Kyle Bowen, director of TLT. “This is just the beginning of collaborations like this that will have additional, far-reaching benefits.”

While the students learned to appreciate multiple perspectives when it comes to creating something, the Faculty Fellows were also learning from their colleagues’ different pedagogical approaches to teaching. They would like the course to continue and are thinking about how it will evolve. 

“I think the six of us came together through our interest in making but there are many other faculty in different disciplines who are also interested,” said Tim Simpson, Paul Morrow Professor in Engineering Design and Manufacturing. “So part of our planning is how can we integrate other faculty or have them contribute labs, lectures, and other activities that expose future Making for the Masses students to even broader perspectives.”

SCTCC on the Rise, SCSU on the Decline for Minnesota High School Grads

College Student
Suprijono Suharjoto, Thinkstock

ST. CLOUD — Minnesota high school students have spoken, two St. Cloud area higher education institutions have made it on the top 10 list for most popular colleges to attend out of high school.

Based on the Minnesota high school graduation class of 2014, St. Cloud State University ranks as  #4 and St. Cloud Technical and Community College ranks as #10 for number of recent in-state high school graduates attending each institution.

For St. Cloud Technical and Community College, they are one of four community/technical colleges to make it in the top 10. Jodi Elness is the Director of Enrollment Management at SCTCC. She says making the top 10 shows SCTCC is committed to helping area students achieve their goals.

“The quality of the programs that we offer, programs really match the employment opportunities that are available in central Minnesota. So when they look out and see the kinds of jobs that are out there, and they look out and they start looking at options for their education, St. Cloud Technical and Community College will often rise to the top of that list.”

SCTCC can also be a good starting place for many new students. Elness says students often choose to go to community college and then transfer to a university to finish their degree.

“We have students that come to us and they want to straight out just start with their generals. A lot of times they’ll come in and say I just want to start with my generals. We offer a nice starting point for them to just come in, an affordable price, take their general education courses and then transfer onto another institution.”

Elness says another institution could be their sister school St. Cloud State or any other school. SCTCC has been working closely with SCSU to offer new programs such as dual enrollment to make the transfer process an almost seamless transition.

Among SCTCC, Normandale Community College comes in at #7, Anoka-Ramsey Community College at #8 and Century College takes the #9 spot.

For four-year institutions, Minnesota high school graduates decided the University of Minnesota – Twin Cities (#1), University of Minnesota – Duluth (#2) and Minnesota State University Mankato (#3) are all better choices than #4 pick St. Cloud State University.

The university has seen primarily a down turn in admission rates over the past six years with the exception of a slight increase in 2015. The institution was formerly ranked as #2.

Dan Gregory is the Interim Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs at SCSU. He says the decline in enrollment of in-state students coming straight out of high school can be due to the economy and students choosing different career paths.

“From our prospective, if a student starts a two-year [institution] and decides to stop with a two-year degree that’s great. Because when we look at the economy and what the economy needs, we need degrees from all types of institutions to have a healthy economy.”

To help increase Minnesota student enrollment at SCSU, Gregory says the university is working closely with local area businesses to know their employment needs as well as making central Minnesota students a priority.

“It’s not only about working with our local high schools and talking about our opportunities but making sure that we are living true to those opportunities. It’s really about talking to employers about what they’re needing from a career prospective and talking to students to make sure they have the support structures they need.”

St. Cloud State’s total enrollment for last year was 15,092, which was down 2.4 percent from the year before.

The top 10 list was created by the Minnesota Office of Higher Education and based on the Minnesota high school graduating class of 2014, of students who enrolled in fall 2014 at a Minnesota post-secondary institution. You can see the full list by clicking the link below.

Minnesota Institutions Attended, Fall 2014

 

Coursera has a new partner to offer employees courses worldwide

Remember MOOCs, the massive open online courses that promised to transform college as we know it? That hasn’t happened, exactly. But MOOCs are alive and growing. And today, one big provider, Coursera, has announced a new partnership with the insurance company AXA to offer free courses to their nearly 150 thousand employees around the world. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

New Student Orientation Underway

“We have the common goal of empowering our students to make informed choices, achieve at the highest levels, and be engaged on campus.”

San Diego State University welcomes nearly 15,000 incoming freshmen, transfer students and their families for New Student and Parent Orientation this summer.

A cross-campus collaboration coordinated by the Division of Student Affairs, New Student Orientation prepares new students for a successful transition into SDSU, with nearly 5,000 freshmen and over 3,000 transfers planning to attend this year’s event. New Student Orientation helps students understand their academic roadmap, with the goal of graduating freshmen students in four years and transfer students in two years.

Students will learn about their General Education and graduation requirements and the course registration system with a focus on taking a full load of courses (15 units). They will also receive information on how to lead a healthy, well balanced life while at the university. Students will also become familiar with useful career resources at SDSU, like meeting with assistant deans and faculty advisors, learning about involvement opportunities and registering for classes.

Parent involvement

Running concurrently with student orientation is parent orientation, where parents meet campus representatives and learn about the many programs available to their students at SDSU. It provides an inside look for parents to see what life will be like for their students during the academic year. Student success data indicates that when parents are involved and connected to the campus, students tend to earn a higher grade point average and are more likely to continue on to their sophomore year.

“At SDSU, it’s a family affair,” said Vice President for Student Affairs Eric Rivera. “Parents are valuable partners that contribute to student success. Orientation is a great opportunity for parents to connect with the campus while learning about the many resources that are available to our students. We have the common goal of empowering our students to make informed choices, achieve at the highest levels, and be engaged on campus.”

Engaging in the Aztec Experience

In addition to helping students develop an academic plan, New Student Orientation also helps students focus on the quality of their experience by sharing opportunities for transformational experiences such as internships, study abroad, undergraduate research and leadership development programs down the road.

Check-in for pre-registered orientation participants begins promptly at 8 a.m. each day in the Conrad Prebys Aztec Student Union. For questions about New Student and Parent Orientation, please contact the Office of New Student and Parent Programs at 619-594-1509 or visit the New Student Orientation website.