Hot Jobs: March 14, 2017

CORPUS CHRISTI (KIII NEWS) – This week’s Hot Jobs report is courtesy of Workforce Solutions of the Coastal Bend.

Location Alice, Texas
Job Number 7180504
Title Field Service Technician
Salary $18.00 – $29.00 Hour
Qualifications Six (6) months prior Experience and a High School Diploma or General Education Development (GED) required.  Will be primarily responsible for the installation, operation, repair, removal, and maintenance of company tools and other oilfield equipment.  Familiar with a variety of field concepts, practices, and procedures a plus. Valid Class A – Commercial Driver’s License required.

Location Corpus Christi, Texas
Job Number 5212113
Title Accountant III-IV
Salary $37,000.00 – $55,000.00 Year +Benefits
Qualifications Five (5) years prior Experience and a Bachelor’s Degree required. Will perform complex accounting work preparing financial statements, records, documents and reports. May specialize in some phase of accounting work such as federal funds accounting, property and equipment control, cost, payroll, and budgeting. Demonstrated knowledge of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) and internal audit controls is required.

Location Corpus Christi, Texas
Job Number 5209096
Title Maintenance Supervisor III
Salary $18.00 Hour +Benefits
Qualifications Four (4) years prior Experience and a High School Diploma or General Education Development (GED) required.  Responsible for the day-to-day maintenance of a large number of units, high complexity, high volume of work orders and repairs. Performs follow-up inspection to insure that proper corrective maintenance action was taken by maintenance employees.  HVAC or EPA certification required.  Valid Class C – Standard Driver’s License required.

Location Portland, Texas
Job Number 6534613
Title Marketing Representative
Salary $13.00 – $15.00 Hour
Qualifications Three (3) years prior Experience and a High School Diploma or General Education Development (GED) required. Responsible for assisting with account retention and providing excellent customer service. Will educate clients about products and services, and making recommendations as needed.  Valid Class C – Standard Driver’s License

Location Kingsville, Texas
Job Number 2991027
Title Purchasing Manager
Salary $47,230.00 – $67,267.00 Year +Benefits
Qualifications Five (5) years prior Experience and Three (3) years College, Technical or Vocational School required.   Performs related managerial and professional duties as assigned. Procures supplies, equipment and services through open market purchasing and competitive bidding procedures. Valid Class C – Standard Driver’s License required.

To learn more about these jobs, call Workforce Solutions of the Coastal Bend at 888-860-JOBS.

Hot Jobs is a segment that is found every Tuesday, on 3News at 5 p.m.

© 2017 KIII-TV

Prufrock: General Education Today, the Perils of Gene Splitting, and Civilization and Childhood

Editorial

  • The ‘Car 54’ Model
  • American Crime Story

Articles

  • Berkeley Goes Offline
  • Which Side Is Gen. Mattis On?
  • Repeal, Replace, Regret
  • The New Assault on Privacy
  • The Brothers Kim
  • In Harm’s Way

Features

  • The Cultured Life

Columnist Cate Rowen: Parents support special education plan

As former and current leaders of Northampton’s special education parent advisory committee (SPEDPAC), we support the inclusion plan proposed for next year’s Northampton School Department budget.

In the past, the SPEDPAC has often come out in opposition to district initiatives that we thought would harm students with special needs, and we always cast a skeptical eye on organizational schemes that propose to save funds by eliminating services for our children.

This time, however, the district is doing something we have been urging them to do for years: implementing co-teaching for inclusion. The proposal provides one or two special educators for each grade level in each elementary school who will work to support students with special education needs in general education classrooms.

Most parents of children who receive special education services want their children to be part of the school community: to make friends and learn alongside their neighbors and peers. When our kids have had to be taught in separate classrooms or schools, it is usually because the classrooms they’re in can’t adapt to their needs.

Co-teaching is a model that allows classrooms to meet the needs of a wide range of students, where all are educated together and disability doesn’t determine what parts of the school experience a child can access.

In the current model, Education Support Professionals (ESPs) are often asked to do work they aren’t trained for: to adapt curriculum and provide direct instruction. Meanwhile, general education teachers are spread thin trying to single-handedly differentiate instruction for a wide range of students. Special education co-teachers will share that load and bring expertise in adapting lessons that will improve instruction for everyone.

In many cases the ESPs who work with our children are beloved, and parents often see their children’s ESPs as the only thing keeping the child from falling apart in school. This proposal offers a plan that is intended to ensure that school is a place that doesn’t cause our children to fall apart. The plan does not do away with all ESP positions; instead it rightly shifts some teaching resources to teachers.

Unlike some proposals we have seen in the past that call for inclusion without support, the current plan provides substantial additional resources in the form of special education teachers, along with training and an expectation that all teachers will collaborate to adapt instruction.

To be sure, the SPEDPAC will monitor the implementation of the plan closely, and we will be the first to speak out if the new co-taught classes are not supporting students effectively. We know that for this to work, general education teachers must be willing to collaborate and special education teams must carefully plan to identify and address each student’s needs.

Parents of children in special education should remember that they can refuse to agree to changes that are inadequate for their child’s needs, and we will continue to support them in asserting their children’s rights.

It is in that context that we urge parents, particularly parents of children receiving special education services, to support realistic and well-supported plans for inclusion for our students. We believe the current proposal represents such a plan.

Cate Rowen has lived in Northampton since 1989 and is the parent of two Northampton students. She is a former president of the Northampton Special Education Parent Advisory Committee. The column also was signed by other current and former SPEDPAC leaders Valle Dwight, Alison Greene, Sarah Hougen and Suna Turgay.

Letter: Illinois students deserve a good funding formula for schools … – The State Journal

Illinois needs a good school funding formula, not just a new one.

The Illinois School Funding Reform Commission recommended what its members say is an evidence-based funding system based on 27 elements that would improve Illinois schools.

Some of the 27 were based on successful efforts in other schools, but some were not. And to get new state funds local school districts would have to do none of the 27. As someone has said, it is like saying if you do X, you get Y, but you do not have to do X.

As an example, for special education, the recommended formula of one position for 141 general education students is based on a study done for the state of Vermont that even Vermont rejected.

Special education funding needs to be related to the need for special education, not based on a fixed number of general education students.

The need for special ed varies widely among Illinois school districts based on concentrated poverty, parental drug use, environmental factors including lead poisoning, premature births, stress in daily living, the family/guardian situation, etc. (and all of these are heading in the wrong direction).

There is no magic school funding formula, but there are good ones and bad ones.

Bev Johns

Jacksonville

Special ed and the feds

Special ed and the feds

Special ed and the feds

Kevin Ivers 



Posted: Sunday, March 12, 2017 7:00 am

Special ed and the feds

By ALEXANDRA NEWMAN – HP Staff Writer

The Herald-Palladium

|
0 comments

Regional Education Service Agencies (RESAs), also called Intermediate School Districts (ISDs), serve the common needs of local school districts.

There are 56 RESAs/ISDs in Michigan, and every school district is part of one. By pooling resources and providing services regionally, RESAs provide cost-effective help to local school districts.

Subscription Required


An online service is needed to view this article in its entirety.


You need an online service to view this article in its entirety.

Have an online subscription?


Subscribe

Choose an online service.

    Current print subscribers


    Subscribe

    Choose an online service.

      Current print subscribers

      on

      Sunday, March 12, 2017 7:00 am.

      Lockwood, Ladwig: Don’t leave special-needs students behind – The Spokesman

      We are two parents with eighth-grade daughters, with different special needs, in public school within Spokane County. Like all parents, we want our daughters to meet their full potential. We are very concerned that proposed bills in the Washington Legislature written to fully fund education will leave them, and other students with special needs, behind.

      Both proposed education budget bills, SB 5607 and HB 1843 (to address McCleary v. State) increase funding for nearly every program except special education. Neither updates the outdated model for special education funding, which is 20 years old, including arbitrary caps and creating a system where local school districts have to make up the gaps in needs as best they can using local levy money and safety net funds.

      Not adequately funding special education affects all students, not just those with special needs. Many students with special needs are in general education classrooms and not meeting their needs can affect the whole class, ask any teacher. Furthermore, all students benefit by inclusion where differently abled students learn together and being different and included is normalized. Our community pays less in tax dollars when all kids achieve positive educational outcomes and we decrease dropout rates and increase post school employment, training or higher education.

      Students with Individual Educational Plans (a federal law requires that public schools create IEPs for every special education student) are two to three times more likely to be suspended or expelled than their peers. One of our daughters was suspended when her IEP was not implemented to provide the supports she needed at recess, related to autism. Three children, all in general education, were affected in this incident, including my daughter. For the rest of that year she primarily read alone at recess, her social skills getting further behind, the IEP ignored.

      For another fourth-grade student with autism, with an IQ above 120, the deescalation room his IEP promised was not set up and instead was used for storage. He was sent to juvenile detention when his behavior escalated, essentially criminalizing autism. Spending money on punitive measures instead of meeting our kid’s needs costs the community more over time. Repeated suspensions and expulsions set up children for poor educational outcomes.

      In elementary school, one of our daughters experienced an IEP that allowed her to work on her academic and social emotional goals with proper peer and staff supports, adapted curriculum and accommodations, allowing independence. Middle school has been a different story. Suddenly, a child who was thriving started to have behaviors described as “combative” and “unsafe.” Her entire middle school experience has been about managing behaviors, with little time spent focusing on her academic goals. Through a Functional Behavior Assessment (a comprehensive assessment that looks at the reasons behind a child’s behavior problems in order to improve behavior), we learned that her “behaviors” stem from decreased involvement (inclusion) with her typically developing peers and limited choice and control in her school day. This non-verbal student has been giving voice to her unmet needs through problem behaviors.

      Fortunately, Spokane Public Schools is reforming discipline practices after the Every Student Counts Alliance brought attention to their high rates of suspensions and expulsions, including disproportionality toward students with special needs. I applaud the commitment and improvements already seen in SPS discipline rates. Further funding will be essential in creating safe environments for teaching and learning for all students.

      Our daughters have the same right to a fully funded education as anyone else, and an even greater need. We know they can be successful, contributing community members and want a system that supports high expectations. The education ombudsman wrote in 2014, in a report to our state education governing bodies, “The evidence is clear that disabilities do not cause disparate outcomes, but that the system itself perpetuates limitations in the expectations and false belief systems about who children with disabilities can be and how much they can achieve in their lifetime.”

      We urge legislators to return to the table and remove the arbitrary cap on special education and keep and raise “the multiplier” tying special education to basic education. We call on our legislators to update and revise our funding model for education and to create comprehensive solutions to our overall budget inadequacies. We need sustainable, equitable and sufficient means to fund our public schools while addressing our other state budget obligations. We don’t need political theater and short-term fixes; we need lawmakers to roll up their sleeves and publicly serve.

      Nikki Lockwood is a volunteer leader with the Every Student Counts Alliance and Fuse Spokane. Darcy Ladwig works in Advocacy and Family Support at The Arc of Spokane.

      Can You Donate To Your Public Schools? HR 610 Threatens Equal …

      Newly minted Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos has never made it a secret that she favors the school voucher system. Both she and President Donald Trump have widely touted the concept of using public money to fund private school tuition to ostensibly offer students a better range of choices for their education. Now DeVos appears to be moving forward with the privatization of public education with pending bill H.R. 610, which is intended to redistribute federal funds away from public schools and repeal nutritional standards in the lunch rooms. Wondering if you can donate to your public school as H.R. 610  looms ahead? Because if this bill is passed… the already financially stretched public school system is going to need every dollar it can find.

      If House Bill 610 is passed, not only will public schools lose vital federal funding to the school voucher system, it would also repeal the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. ESEA has provided accesible programs for children with disabilities, school safety, rural education, children living in poverty, and English as a Second Language classes for decades. Through federal funding ESEA has ensured general education curriculum standards have been met. Without the federal funding to support these programs, the public school system will undoubtedly suffer.

      Another integral program H.R. 610 seeks to abolish is the No Hungry Kids Act of 2012, according to the Congress website:

      Charley Gallay/Getty Images Entertainment/Getty Images

      The No Hungry Kids Act also provides funding for in-school breakfast and lunch programs. Republican Rep. Steve King of Iowa has been attempting to repeal the No Hungry Kids Act for the past three congressional sessions, according to The Lunch Box, and has not gotten much support to date. But attached to the larger H.R. 610, this could potentially be the year when things change.

      Andrew Burton/Getty Images News/Getty Images

      For those looking to donate to their local public school, a visit to DonorsChoose.org will connect you with your closest local public school and offer options for how to donate. Or you can visit the school in person to drop off a much-needed donation. You can donate money, school supplies, musical instruments, sports equipment, computers, and furniture. It’s a good idea to put your donation in writing to your district school board by contacting the treasurer or superintendent. Another great way to donate is to support a particular program you would like to see protected; you can do this by supporting a third-party “booster” program that helps raise funds for public schools, or specify in your written donation which program you would like to support.

      The public school system is being threatened, and it’s important to support it in any way we can. Contacting your local representative, donating money or time or supplies to your local schools, and refusing to turn a blind eye to the dangerous H.R. 610. That’s how we can protect the public school system.

      Can You Donate To Your Public Schools? HR 610 Threatens Equal Opportunity In Education

      Newly minted Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos has never made it a secret that she favors the school voucher system. Both she and President Donald Trump have widely touted the concept of using public money to fund private school tuition to ostensibly offer students a better range of choices for their education. Now DeVos appears to be moving forward with the privatization of public education with pending bill H.R. 610, which is intended to redistribute federal funds away from public schools and repeal nutritional standards in the lunch rooms. Wondering if you can donate to your public school as H.R. 610  looms ahead? Because if this bill is passed… the already financially stretched public school system is going to need every dollar it can find.

      If House Bill 610 is passed, not only will public schools lose vital federal funding to the school voucher system, it would also repeal the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. ESEA has provided accesible programs for children with disabilities, school safety, rural education, children living in poverty, and English as a Second Language classes for decades. Through federal funding ESEA has ensured general education curriculum standards have been met. Without the federal funding to support these programs, the public school system will undoubtedly suffer.

      Another integral program H.R. 610 seeks to abolish is the No Hungry Kids Act of 2012, according to the Congress website:

      Charley Gallay/Getty Images Entertainment/Getty Images

      The No Hungry Kids Act also provides funding for in-school breakfast and lunch programs. Republican Rep. Steve King of Iowa has been attempting to repeal the No Hungry Kids Act for the past three congressional sessions, according to The Lunch Box, and has not gotten much support to date. But attached to the larger H.R. 610, this could potentially be the year when things change.

      Andrew Burton/Getty Images News/Getty Images

      For those looking to donate to their local public school, a visit to DonorsChoose.org will connect you with your closest local public school and offer options for how to donate. Or you can visit the school in person to drop off a much-needed donation. You can donate money, school supplies, musical instruments, sports equipment, computers, and furniture. It’s a good idea to put your donation in writing to your district school board by contacting the treasurer or superintendent. Another great way to donate is to support a particular program you would like to see protected; you can do this by supporting a third-party “booster” program that helps raise funds for public schools, or specify in your written donation which program you would like to support.

      The public school system is being threatened, and it’s important to support it in any way we can. Contacting your local representative, donating money or time or supplies to your local schools, and refusing to turn a blind eye to the dangerous H.R. 610. That’s how we can protect the public school system.

      Vero Beach man who died in crash had local impact – TCPalm.com

      INDIAN RIVER COUNTY — The Vero Beach man who died in an Indian River Shores crash Thursday morning was someone who had an impact in the community, said School District Superintendent Mark Rendell.

      John Pierce Keller, 51, was the founder and owner of Coastal Behavior Analysis, a group of professionals dedicated to serving individuals with autism spectrum disorders, severe behavior disorders and developmental disabilities, according to its Facebook page.

      “When John worked with the School District, he positively impacted the lives of so very many,” Rendell said. “Even though he was no longer an employee, he was still part of our family, and so this is a tremendous loss.”

      Keller worked 15 years in the district as a behavior analyst at elementary and middle schools.

      On Thursday morning, Keller was driving a Chevrolet Corvette southbound in the 8300 block of State Road A1A about 7:45 a.m. when for unknown reasons he went off the road toward the west and hit a concrete utility pole in front of the Sea Colony community, officials said. Keller, who was wearing a seat belt, was pronounced dead at the scene.

      The cause of the crash remained under investigation Friday.

      The following message was posted late Thursday on Coastal Behavior Analysis’ Facebook page:

      It is with our deepest regret to announce that the founder and owner of Coastal Behavior Analysis, John Keller, unexpectedly passed away this morning. John was so much more than the owner of Coastal Behavior Analysis. He was a beloved supervisor and friend to so many people. Because of John and the services he made available to so many people with disabilities, this community is a better place. He truly has touched so many lives.

      We will continue to post details regarding memorials and how people can help his family as we learn them. Please feel free to contact the Coastal Behavior Analysis’ Center for Autism Research and Education with any questions you may have or if you would like resources to help with the grieving process.

      According to Coastal Behavior Analysis’ website:

      Keller earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Rollins College in Winter Park in 1987. He received a master’s degree in social work from Barry University in Miami Shores in 1992.

      After working in the mental health field for several years, Keller entered the education field when he began working for the Indian River County School District.

      In 2010, he founded Coastal Behavior Analysis to offer home and community-based applied behavior analysis therapy to people diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder along the East Coast. The company grew slow to maintain its focus on providing quality services.

      In 2016, Keller opened office space in Vero Beach and hired Dr. Alison Betz to oversee the Center for Autism Research and Education.

      TEA slowly working to remove special education indicator …

      The Texas Education Agency has been working over the last four years to eventually eliminate the Performance-Based Monitoring Analysis System’s special education representation indicator that suggests school districts keep special education enrollment at or below 8.5 percent, the TEA said in a statement released in November.

      “Allegations that TEA issued fines, conducted on-site monitoring visits, required the hiring of consultants, et cetera, when districts provided special education services to more than 8.5 percent of their students are entirely false,” said Penny Schwinn, TEA deputy commissioner of academics, in the statement.

      In Conroe ISD, the percent of students enrolled in special education has steadily decreased from 10.4 percent to 8.2 percent since 2005—a trend Teresa Canon, the district’s director of special education, credits partly to an overall increase in the student population over the last decade.

      “The decrease that we’ve had is due in part to a rapid increase in enrollment, but more so due to a reduction in the number of students identified with learning disabilities,” Canon said. “That’s due largely to a change in the criteria. We used to have a simple formula where if there was a simple mathematical difference, you were called learning-disabled.”TEA slowly working to remove special education indicator

      Practices have evolved, affecting who is placed in special education, Canon said. To be eligible, a student must have an identified disability, and that student must need special education because of that disability.

      “We have federal and state laws that dictate how students are eligible for special education,” Canon said. “There are disability categories that are identified, and we have to have specially licensed and credentialed individuals who do comprehensive educational evaluations to determine a student’s eligibility for special education.”

      TEA is working to implement changes that will address federal requirements for different indicators of special education representation, disciplinary removals and educational placements based on race, ethnicity and disability categories, TEA information specialist Lauren Callahan said.

      “We anticipate the PBMAS rule that incorporates these significantly expanded federal requirements regarding special education representation—including a federal requirement that a threshold be set to identify districts with significant disproportionality—will be proposed in the spring,” Callahan said.

      With the PBMAS system, school districts would not be looked into until the special education population exceeded a 15 percent threshold, Canon said. At that point, a district may be asked to reassess its methods and set specific goals.

      “It’s a little misleading, I think, that there’s some punishment if we go over 8.5 [percent],” Canon said. “That whole performance-based monitoring system has multiple indicators. There are quite a few things they look at, and if a district has multiple issues in multiple areas, then certainly you would be asked to do an analysis.”

      Canon, who has more than 30 years of experience in special education, said the 8.5 percent target has never had any effects on the number of students the district identifies as needing special education services.

      “The number out there by TEA for whatever reason has never governed our decisions about whether a child is eligible,” Canon said. “If they are eligible for special education, we serve them in special education.”

      The goal in CISD is to meet the needs of special education students so they can move into and be successful in general education classes, Canon said.

      “There are some students that reach a point where they no longer require special education services and they may exit,” she said. “The majority do continue to need those services throughout their educational career.”