Job-training classes in Van Buren to begin in January – News …

Western Arkansas Employment Development Agency in Van Buren is enrolling now for job training classes to begin the second week of January.

WAEDA is a federally funded nonprofit that provides job training and placement services to unemployed and underemployed dislocated workers and disadvantaged youth and adults.

Currently, the program has 118 openings for job retraining classes and money to help clients go back to school, said Tia Pinkston, WAEDA assistant administrator.

“We can help with the cost of tuition and books; we can help pay for child care for somebody that is going back to school; we can help pay for transportation costs,” Pinkston said.

Local schools that provide courses as part of the WAEDA program include the University of Arkansas at Fort Smith and Arkansas Tech University-Ozark.

Once clients complete job training, WAEDA helps them get placed in area jobs, Pinkston said.

“When they come out on the other end, they have a really good job and can sustain their families with that,” Pinkston said.

Applicants are assessed and placed in job training for careers on the occupational demand list provided by the state, said program manager Carman Hensley. Jobs on the list are in high demand in the state.

One of the job programs that currently is the most successful and in high demand is nursing, Pinkston said.

WAEDA must meet a high performance level required by the state, with a large percentage of clients placed directly into jobs, said administrator Martha Anne Holt.

“That’s what the program is for,” Hensley said. “When they come in here it needs to be an understanding that we’re training them to go to work.”

Adult eligibility is generally determined by income, while there is wider eligibility for the youth program, which is for people aged 16 to 24 that are not in school.

WAEDA also offers programs for dislocated workers who have been unemployed long term or are displaced because of a company closure.

“Typically our focus is either on reeducating or training for jobs, or finding them direct placement into work,” Pinkston said. “Along with there’s a whole range of case management that goes into that where we take that person in, nurture them.”

Adults must receive their general education diploma or high school diploma to be eligible for the program, but WAEDA can help with accomplishing that goal, Pinkston said. There is no education requirement for the youth program, she said.

Goals and strengths are determined with assessments that help WAEDA staff find appropriate job placement for their clients, Pinkston said.

“That’s the end result, to get these people employed and making a livable wage and supporting their families or themselves,” Pinkston said.

WAEDA also places clients in temporary training jobs, mostly with public entities such as county offices or public library, at no cost to the employer, Holt said.

Wages are paid with FEMA grants as they are made available and if the need is there, Pinkston said.

“Basically they’re getting a quality employee, and typically their funding is short just like everybody’s,” Pinkston said. “They’re feeling a need and benefiting from our program, and (it’s) benefiting the person who’s placed there because they’re receiving really excellent job training.”

Hourly wages and benefits are paid with grant money until it runs out, but often workers are hired once the program ends, Pinkston said.

“It saves employers a lot of training expense,” said Della Winford, program monitor. “By the time they get them trained, they’re more likely to hire them.”

Other services offered by WAEDA include free job search resources such as resume writing and career counseling, and providing referrals to other services such as those for literacy, shelter and food.

“A lot of people don’t know they can come in here and do a resume for free…instead of paying someone or fighting with it on their own computer,”Hensley said.

“They can print it here, fax it from here – anything career oriented they can basically do from here,” Pinkston added.

Jobs listed by the Arkansas Department of Workforce Services in Fort Smith also can be searched in the Van Buren office.

“If they find something their interested in, then we send them over there to talk to someone,” Winford said.

WAEDA has been in Crawford County since 1978 and serves about 225 people a year, Holt said. Most of the openings for January classes are because of clients graduating this month, Hensley said.

WAEDA’s office in Van Buren is  at 1500 E. Main St. For information, visit the website to email staff or call them at (479) 474-7061.

Job-training classes in Van Buren to begin in January

Western Arkansas Employment Development Agency in Van Buren is enrolling now for job training classes to begin the second week of January.

WAEDA is a federally funded nonprofit that provides job training and placement services to unemployed and underemployed dislocated workers and disadvantaged youth and adults.

Currently, the program has 118 openings for job retraining classes and money to help clients go back to school, said Tia Pinkston, WAEDA assistant administrator.

“We can help with the cost of tuition and books; we can help pay for child care for somebody that is going back to school; we can help pay for transportation costs,” Pinkston said.

Local schools that provide courses as part of the WAEDA program include the University of Arkansas at Fort Smith and Arkansas Tech University-Ozark.

Once clients complete job training, WAEDA helps them get placed in area jobs, Pinkston said.

“When they come out on the other end, they have a really good job and can sustain their families with that,” Pinkston said.

Applicants are assessed and placed in job training for careers on the occupational demand list provided by the state, said program manager Carman Hensley. Jobs on the list are in high demand in the state.

One of the job programs that currently is the most successful and in high demand is nursing, Pinkston said.

WAEDA must meet a high performance level required by the state, with a large percentage of clients placed directly into jobs, said administrator Martha Anne Holt.

“That’s what the program is for,” Hensley said. “When they come in here it needs to be an understanding that we’re training them to go to work.”

Adult eligibility is generally determined by income, while there is wider eligibility for the youth program, which is for people aged 16 to 24 that are not in school.

WAEDA also offers programs for dislocated workers who have been unemployed long term or are displaced because of a company closure.

“Typically our focus is either on reeducating or training for jobs, or finding them direct placement into work,” Pinkston said. “Along with there’s a whole range of case management that goes into that where we take that person in, nurture them.”

Adults must receive their general education diploma or high school diploma to be eligible for the program, but WAEDA can help with accomplishing that goal, Pinkston said. There is no education requirement for the youth program, she said.

Goals and strengths are determined with assessments that help WAEDA staff find appropriate job placement for their clients, Pinkston said.

“That’s the end result, to get these people employed and making a livable wage and supporting their families or themselves,” Pinkston said.

WAEDA also places clients in temporary training jobs, mostly with public entities such as county offices or public library, at no cost to the employer, Holt said.

Wages are paid with FEMA grants as they are made available and if the need is there, Pinkston said.

“Basically they’re getting a quality employee, and typically their funding is short just like everybody’s,” Pinkston said. “They’re feeling a need and benefiting from our program, and (it’s) benefiting the person who’s placed there because they’re receiving really excellent job training.”

Hourly wages and benefits are paid with grant money until it runs out, but often workers are hired once the program ends, Pinkston said.

“It saves employers a lot of training expense,” said Della Winford, program monitor. “By the time they get them trained, they’re more likely to hire them.”

Other services offered by WAEDA include free job search resources such as resume writing and career counseling, and providing referrals to other services such as those for literacy, shelter and food.

“A lot of people don’t know they can come in here and do a resume for free…instead of paying someone or fighting with it on their own computer,”Hensley said.

“They can print it here, fax it from here – anything career oriented they can basically do from here,” Pinkston added.

Jobs listed by the Arkansas Department of Workforce Services in Fort Smith also can be searched in the Van Buren office.

“If they find something their interested in, then we send them over there to talk to someone,” Winford said.

WAEDA has been in Crawford County since 1978 and serves about 225 people a year, Holt said. Most of the openings for January classes are because of clients graduating this month, Hensley said.

WAEDA’s office in Van Buren is  at 1500 E. Main St. For information, visit the website to email staff or call them at (479) 474-7061.

Kansas State student | 4.0 GPA | calls college a scam

You have to give this kid some credit for thinking outside the box. He’ll probably go far.

Inside Higher Ed reports:

Giving the Finger to K-State and General Education

Billy Willson finished his first (and his last) semester at Kansas State University this week — and in so doing has set off a debate there and beyond on the value of college and of general education in particular.

In a Facebook post, he announced that he was dropping out, despite having earned a 4.0 grade point average. He said that he would start his own business and learn more from that experience than anything he could hope to achieve at Kansas State or any college. He ran a photo of himself giving the finger to Kansas State, although he’s since said he really wants to be doing that to all of higher education.

Many Inside Higher Ed readers will likely find his comments insulting and ill informed, and some faculty members and students at K-State have pointed out that he wrote some things that are factually questionable. But Willson is attracting many fans online as his Facebook post has gone viral — and trashing course requirements and general education seems to be a big part of Willson’s appeal.

“YOU ARE BEING SCAMMED,” Willson wrote on Facebook. (The wording, grammar and capitalization quoted here and later in this story are verbatim from Willson’s and others’ social media posts.) “You may not see it today or tomorrow, but you will see it some day. Heck you may have already seen it if you’ve been through college.

Hat tip to the TaxProfBlog.

Featured image is a screen cap.



San Joaquin Valley College OK’d

Posted: Friday, December 23, 2016 6:00 am

San Joaquin Valley College OK’d

By MYLES BARKER

mbarker@portervillerecorder.com

Recorderonline.com

College hints at an expanding curriculum in the future

The Porterville City Council approved Tuesday a conditional use permit to allow San Joaquin Valley College (SJVC) to locate at 314 N. Main St., with the stipulation the instruction area cannot exceed 5,000 square feet.

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      Friday, December 23, 2016 6:00 am.

      Here’s why an ex-N.J. student dropped out of college with a 4.0

      Billy Willson did enough to get a 4.0 grade-point average in his first semester at Kansas State University.

      Willson already knows he won’t match that perfect mark in the spring, though. In fact, the former Brick resident won’t be returning at all.

      Denouncing college as a “scam,” Willson posted a lengthy online diatribe that has gone viral in which he says he’s dropping out of school to start his own business. The Facebook missive has been shared more than 11,000 times as of Friday morning and has drawn coverage from USA Today, the Huffington Post and other large, general interest websites. 

      The post begins with a grinning Willson, who now lives in Olathe, Kansas, sticking up his left, middle finger at a Kansas State sign. 

      He goes on to blast the need to take general education courses and the cost of text books and tuition all to get a job where large pay increases will be hard to come by.

      “YOU ARE BEING SCAMMED,” Willson wrote. “You are being put thousands into debt to learn things you will never even use. Wasting 4 years of your life to be stuck at a paycheck that grows slower than the rate of inflation. Paying $200 for a $6 textbook.

      “Being taught by teacher’s who have never done what they’re teaching. Average income has increased 5x over the last 40 years while cost of college has increased 18x. You’re spending thousands of dollars to learn information you won’t ever even use just to get a piece of paper.”

      Nearly 8,000 comments were left — many supportive of Wilson’s plan to blaze his own path without a degree and saying they agreed with him that college was a rip-off. Others criticized Wilson for either being entitled or asking how it’s possible to get a good job without going to college.

      Willson now refers to himself as entrepreneur and the CEO/creator of RaveWave, a clothing brand.

      Jeff Goldman may be reached at jeff_goldman@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @JeffSGoldman. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

      Kearney school’s campaign hits goal of $10 million for center – Omaha World

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      General trapper education course in Lewiston

      Posted: Wednesday, December 21, 2016 12:00 pm

      General trapper education course in Lewiston


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      A standard trapper education course, not including wolf-trapping certification will be held on Saturday, Jan. 28, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Fish and Game office at 3316 16th Street in Lewiston. 

      To register for the class, please go to:

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          Wednesday, December 21, 2016 12:00 pm.

          Don’t Fear General Education

          It’s odd, given that general education courses at a liberal arts college comprise about a third of a college student’s coursework, that colleges have done a pretty poor job of making a case for the fundamental power of the core curriculum. I suspect one reason is because they are afraid to do so, given prospective students’ approach to the requirement. In all candor, neglecting to highlight general education programs in promotional materials is probably some form of clumsiness, ivory-toweritis or omission based on fear–combined with an unhealthy historic emphasis on course content as opposed to learning outcomes and skill development. The resulting perception is that a course in religion is focused only on religion, rather than critical thinking.

          12/21 ccc reaches goal – Kearney Hub: Unpublished

          Posted: Wednesday, December 21, 2016 11:00 am

          12/21 ccc reaches goal

          KEARNEY — Central Community College’s Kearney Center Major Gifts Campaign reached its $10 million goal Monday, Dean Moors, campaign manager and executive director of the Central Community College Foundation, said.

          The campaign, the first of its kind for the CCC Foundation, was launched in early 2015 to help support Central Community College in building a new 63,000-square-foot facility in Kearney, CCC said in a news release.

          The total project cost is $23.3 million, with $10 million coming from the major gifts campaign and $13.3 million coming from college reserves and short-term facility bonds.

          Because of the campaign’s success, the new center will open for the 2017 fall semester, a year earlier than projected. Construction started in May on 30th Avenue and West 11th Street, directly north of the new Kearney High School.

          The new facility will allow the college to grow and better serve students seeking nursing, skilled and technical sciences, information technology and general education courses; business and industry training; adult education opportunities and community education classes.

          “This project is becoming a reality because of strong support from the Kearney community, surrounding region and state,” Moors said. “We appreciate every donation, whether it was large or small, that we received from individuals, families, businesses and other foundations. They were the key to this campaign’s success.”

          Moors also cited the dedication and work of the campaign’s executive committee: Jon Abegglen, First National Bank; Dawn Chavanu, Great Plains Asbestos Control Inc.; Dale Pohlmann, retired; Darren Robinson, Economic Development Council of Buffalo County; John Sahling, Sahling Kenworth Inc.; Dan Schulte, Baldwin Filters; Dallas Wegner, Midlands Contracting Inc.; and Greg Smith, Deb Brennan, Marcie Kemnitz, Kelly Christensen and Joel King, all of CCC.

          More about Commerce

          • ARTICLE: Legal notices: Dec 22, 2016 (12-22-16)
          • ARTICLE: CCC-Kearney campaign reaches $10 million goal (12-21-16)
          • ARTICLE: DPPD warns customers of possible phone scam (12-21-16)
          • ARTICLE: Lawmakers, don’t create unfunded mandates (12-21-16)

          More about Politics

          • ARTICLE: Legal notices: Dec 22, 2016 (12-22-16)
          • ARTICLE: CCC-Kearney campaign reaches $10 million goal (12-21-16)
          • ARTICLE: It’s Christmas, let’s consider simple gifts (12-21-16)
          • ARTICLE: Jorgensen hired as Senior Associate Athletic Director (12-21-16)

          More about Campaign

          • ARTICLE: CCC-Kearney campaign reaches $10 million goal (12-21-16)
          • ARTICLE: Give Where You Live, thanks (12-07-16)
          • ARTICLE: Businesses can give drive a big shot in the arm Saturday (12-03-16)
          • ARTICLE: Goodfellows business drive set for Saturday (12-02-16)
          • Discuss

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          Wednesday, December 21, 2016 11:00 am.


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          Education

          PCHS to offer early college, internship programs – News – Pekin …

          PEKIN — Pekin Community High School students will have some new opportunities next year to help them get early college credits or hands on experience at local businesses.

          PCHS will launch two programs in the 2017-2018 school year — the Early College Program and the PCHS Internship Program.

          The qualifications for a student to enter either program are the same, said Assistant Superintendent Melissa Bloom.
          Students must have  three or fewer credits remaining of required courses at the start of the student’s senior year, have a grade-point average of 2.8 prior to the start of  the school year, have no suspensions and have seven or fewer absences each semester of the student’s junior year.

          The high school will host a career and internship day at 6 p.m. on Jan. 17 for juniors and parents. Businesses are invited to come to the career fair to talk to students about possible internships and other opportunities.

          Internship

          The Internship Program allows students to work for local businesses where they will learn skills associated with a possible career choice. The internship may be paid or unpaid. Students will not be given credit for the internship toward high school graduation. However, Bloom said, “We think what they’ll really get out of that is some real world work experience (and) some good networking skills.”

          “These students would be students who are  looking to get a leg up on a career interest that they have by having the ability to start working in the field they’re interested in,” said Bloom. “They will be responsible for finding their internship. We’ll, of course, promote the fact that we want our students to have the opportunity. I think area businesses will be excited to hear about that and then contact us and say, ‘We’d like somebody. Can you send somebody our way?’ But ultimately, it will be the student that goes out and seeks an internship.”

          Students must turn in a form with the company supervisor’s name, hours and job duties. She said the program has been in concert with local businesses. The student must also show the counsellor how the internship they are requesting fits in with the career goals.

          ICC classes

          PCHS entered an agreement with Illinois Central College that allows seniors to work on college credit courses while still attending high school. The student can earn up to 12 credits over two semesters. Students will be given up to two hours per day. 

          Counselors will steer students toward general education classes — prerequisites, general education and introduction classes required for other college programs such as art, humanities, philosophy, business, composition, math, economics, psychology, sociology and music appreciation. 

          Students will be responsible for the cost of the class, which is currently $135 per credit hour, as well as books and fees. They must also provide their own transportation.

          The ICC class will not replace a required PCHS class for graduation. Students must still fulfill required credits to graduate from high school.

          “We did go ahead and sort of self-select some courses that we knew, based off of ICC’s schedule in the past, were offered frequently,” said Bloom. “They have a lot of sections and they transfer to other colleges easily.

          “We didn’t want to hurt our own electives by having students leave to take the same electives at ICC, but at the same time we didn’t want to tell these students they couldn’t take these courses at ICC, which then would transfer.”

          Bloom said that ICC has been awarded a special PELL Grant for such projects, so students will be directed to apply for financial assistance if they are qualified.