Variety of services available through Literacy Council of Reading-Berks

Reading Eagle: Michelle N. Lynch | Ryan A. Breisch, executive director Literacy Council of Reading-Berks, says the agency offers a variety of services to people in the community.

Grain Elevator and Processing Society, K-State offer 4 September courses

Registration is now open for four grain handling and processing operations courses from the Grain Elevator and Processing Society and Kansas State University in September. These online courses run from Sept. 11 through Oct. 13, and registration closes Sept. 5. Courses can be completed any time over the five week schedule, and each offering should take approximately 10 hours to complete.

GEAPS 501: Management Basics for Grain Facility Supervisors

This course will provide an extensive overview of the main duties, responsibilities and expectations of grain operations supervisors and managers. It will cover essential duties, topics and roles supervisors and managers need to understand, and why they are important.

GEAPS 510: Grain Facilities Planning and Design I

This course covers the key factors and information needed to build new facilities or modernize existing structures. Lectures cover facility types and capacities, storage structures, equipment, layouts and site selection. At the end of the course, participants will lay out a simple facility.

GEAPS 545: Grain Entrapment: Causes, Prevention and Rescue

Participants learn how to identify problem areas, perform preventative maintenance and use equipment and systems to prevent entrapment. Lectures address government regulations, grain unloading and reclaiming, grain bin safety equipment and emergency preparedness.

GEAPS 620: Grain Receiving, Cleaning and Conditioning

This course teaches students the basic principles of milling by covering each step of the milling processing in detail. The first half of the course covers grain receiving, handling, storage and blending. The second half focuses on grain separation and cleaning, and the differences between grain conditioning and tempering. This course will help students identify the equipment used in the milling process and apply that knowledge in practical situations.

GEAPS 501 and 510 are both required for the Credential in Grain Operations Management, and GEAPS 620 is required for the Credential in Grain Processing Management. Learn more about the credential program at https://www.geaps.com.

Tuition for GEAPS/K-State continuing education courses is $685 for GEAPS members and $895 for non-members. GEAPS also offers flexible group training options, including courses on-demand and volume discounts. For more information about the courses or to register, visit the GEAPS website, contact Katya Morrell or call 763-999-4300.

Bridging the gap between education and business – The Lima News

OTTAWA — Efforts were being made by local educators and businesses to bridge the gap between education and the business world.

Bridging the gap

The Putnam County Chamber of Commerce and an Ottawa-Glandorf High School business teacher created an experimental program last year, Emerging Business Leaders. The program was created with the intention of connecting junior and senior high school students who had taken at least three years of elective business classes with CEOs or owners of local businesses, said Amy Sealts, executive director of The Putnam County Chamber of Commerce.

“The local businesses wanted to show students their culture in the type of careers and businesses available here in Putnam County,” Sealts said.

Four local businesses participated in the program last year, representing the four different avenues of business: finance, medical, manufacturing and entrepreneurship, she said. Representatives gave presentations to the high school students, giving them information on the business and how it operated. Afterward, the students were given the opportunity to ask questions and then were given a tour of the facility to see a functioning business, Sealts said.

“We didn’t just want it to be a tour,” she said. “The chamber contacted the CEO or manager of each business and asked if they would meet with the students. The students got to sit down and have a two-hour face-to-face meeting with business leaders.”

Diane Schimming, a business teacher at Ottawa-Glandorf High School, helped Sealts plan the EBL program. It began as a conversation about connecting high school students with businesses so they could get an understanding of the different employment opportunities available after high school, she said. Sealts called Schimming weeks later and told her the chamber had received a confidential donation to find the program if she were still interested in planning one, Schimming said.

Junior and senior high school students with at least three years of elective business classes were chosen because they were at a higher level of education, showed interest in business, and preparing for college, she said. The first group to participate last year were 12 senior accounting students, Schimming said.

Before each visit, the 12 students would meet with her and they would research the business they were to visit, and then come up with 20 questions they would ask, she said. The questions covered education, advantages of the business, and random questions that came up during the meeting.

“There was a lot of different feedback,” Schimming said. “A lot of different questions came up during the conversations.”

The chamber received funding for two years of the program, she said. Sealts and Schimming are planning to continue the program through this school year and look for another funding source after that to take the program into the future.

“I think what it [EBL] did was give those students insight into different opportunities to consider when they get into college,” she aid.

Eliminating the gap

Apollo Career Center seems more interested in eliminating the gap between education and businesses instead of just bridging it. Apollo is a trade school in Lima, with a licensed practical nurse training facility in Ottawa. The school has staff working directly with local businesses learning what jobs they need filled and training people to fill those jobs.

“We service 13 counties in central and northwestern Ohio,” said Tara Shepherd, business and industry liaison with Apollo Career Center.

Shepherd and another liaison, Toby Prinsen, stay connected to local businesses to keep up to date with their employment needs. Apollo staff will help train employees in certifications the businesses need and ensuring students are trained as well.

“If businesses are opening a new line or upgrading technology, we go to the business and provide training for their staff,” Prinsen said. “The information is also added to the curriculum. Our curriculum is constantly changing as we keep up with the current technology.”

Skilled-trade jobs are a growing job market and skilled employees to work them are highly sought after, Shepherd and Prinsen said.

“We have companies willing to hire people between their junior and senior years so they can work those three months hoping to entice them to return after they graduate,” Prinsen said.

Apollo offers two different educational programs, one for adults and one for high school students. The adult program can last between a few weeks to 15 months, Shepherd said. After graduating students can enter the workforce with in an entry-level position that pays well. They can also move onto an associate or bachelor’s degree program.

High school students can take a two-year program that covers all general-education classes of high school and two hours or training in an adult program of their choosing, Shepherd said. After graduating high school students are ready to enter the workforce with an entry-level job making $17 an hour. They can also move onto colleges and some of the classes they took at Apollo will count toward college credit.

Apollo also provides a GED course and remedial-education classes in subjects such as math and English to help nontraditional students begin pursuing training and education for better job, Shepherd said.

“The jobs are there,” said Brenda Burgy, a spokeswoman with Apollo Career Center.” People just need to get the training for them.”

By Bryan Reynolds

[email protected]

Reach Bryan Reynolds at 567-242-0362

Reach Bryan Reynolds at 567-242-0362

Bridging the gap between education and business

OTTAWA — Efforts were being made by local educators and businesses to bridge the gap between education and the business world.

Bridging the gap

The Putnam County Chamber of Commerce and an Ottawa-Glandorf High School business teacher created an experimental program last year, Emerging Business Leaders. The program was created with the intention of connecting junior and senior high school students who had taken at least three years of elective business classes with CEOs or owners of local businesses, said Amy Sealts, executive director of The Putnam County Chamber of Commerce.

“The local businesses wanted to show students their culture in the type of careers and businesses available here in Putnam County,” Sealts said.

Four local businesses participated in the program last year, representing the four different avenues of business: finance, medical, manufacturing and entrepreneurship, she said. Representatives gave presentations to the high school students, giving them information on the business and how it operated. Afterward, the students were given the opportunity to ask questions and then were given a tour of the facility to see a functioning business, Sealts said.

“We didn’t just want it to be a tour,” she said. “The chamber contacted the CEO or manager of each business and asked if they would meet with the students. The students got to sit down and have a two-hour face-to-face meeting with business leaders.”

Diane Schimming, a business teacher at Ottawa-Glandorf High School, helped Sealts plan the EBL program. It began as a conversation about connecting high school students with businesses so they could get an understanding of the different employment opportunities available after high school, she said. Sealts called Schimming weeks later and told her the chamber had received a confidential donation to find the program if she were still interested in planning one, Schimming said.

Junior and senior high school students with at least three years of elective business classes were chosen because they were at a higher level of education, showed interest in business, and preparing for college, she said. The first group to participate last year were 12 senior accounting students, Schimming said.

Before each visit, the 12 students would meet with her and they would research the business they were to visit, and then come up with 20 questions they would ask, she said. The questions covered education, advantages of the business, and random questions that came up during the meeting.

“There was a lot of different feedback,” Schimming said. “A lot of different questions came up during the conversations.”

The chamber received funding for two years of the program, she said. Sealts and Schimming are planning to continue the program through this school year and look for another funding source after that to take the program into the future.

“I think what it [EBL] did was give those students insight into different opportunities to consider when they get into college,” she aid.

Eliminating the gap

Apollo Career Center seems more interested in eliminating the gap between education and businesses instead of just bridging it. Apollo is a trade school in Lima, with a licensed practical nurse training facility in Ottawa. The school has staff working directly with local businesses learning what jobs they need filled and training people to fill those jobs.

“We service 13 counties in central and northwestern Ohio,” said Tara Shepherd, business and industry liaison with Apollo Career Center.

Shepherd and another liaison, Toby Prinsen, stay connected to local businesses to keep up to date with their employment needs. Apollo staff will help train employees in certifications the businesses need and ensuring students are trained as well.

“If businesses are opening a new line or upgrading technology, we go to the business and provide training for their staff,” Prinsen said. “The information is also added to the curriculum. Our curriculum is constantly changing as we keep up with the current technology.”

Skilled-trade jobs are a growing job market and skilled employees to work them are highly sought after, Shepherd and Prinsen said.

“We have companies willing to hire people between their junior and senior years so they can work those three months hoping to entice them to return after they graduate,” Prinsen said.

Apollo offers two different educational programs, one for adults and one for high school students. The adult program can last between a few weeks to 15 months, Shepherd said. After graduating students can enter the workforce with in an entry-level position that pays well. They can also move onto an associate or bachelor’s degree program.

High school students can take a two-year program that covers all general-education classes of high school and two hours or training in an adult program of their choosing, Shepherd said. After graduating high school students are ready to enter the workforce with an entry-level job making $17 an hour. They can also move onto colleges and some of the classes they took at Apollo will count toward college credit.

Apollo also provides a GED course and remedial-education classes in subjects such as math and English to help nontraditional students begin pursuing training and education for better job, Shepherd said.

“The jobs are there,” said Brenda Burgy, a spokeswoman with Apollo Career Center.” People just need to get the training for them.”

By Bryan Reynolds

[email protected]

Reach Bryan Reynolds at 567-242-0362

Reach Bryan Reynolds at 567-242-0362

Lodi AP students driven to succeed – Lodi News

08_15_17_AP_CLASS_02.jpg

08_15_17_AP_CLASS_02.jpg

BEA AHBECK/NEWS-SENTINEL Students Ravneet Rajasansi and Rivaldo Mendoza, both 16, work on problems during an AP calculus class at Tokay High in Lodi Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017.

08_15_17_AP_CLASS_03.JPG

08_15_17_AP_CLASS_03.JPG

BEA AHBECK/NEWS-SENTINEL during an AP calculus class at Tokay High in Lodi Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017.

08_15_17_AP_CLASS_04.jpg

08_15_17_AP_CLASS_04.jpg

BEA AHBECK/NEWS-SENTINEL Teacher Agatha Smith teaches her AP calculus class at Tokay High in Lodi Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017.

08_15_17_AP_CLASS_01.JPG

08_15_17_AP_CLASS_01.JPG

BEA AHBECK/NEWS-SENTINEL Teacher Agatha Smith works with student Cara Griffin, 15, during AP calculus class at Tokay High in Lodi Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017.



Posted: Thursday, August 17, 2017 11:30 am

Lodi AP students driven to succeed

By John Bays/News-Sentinel Staff Writer

Lodi News-Sentinel

As the college application process becomes more competitive each year, many students feel pressure from both their parents and themselves to take as many Advanced Placement classes as possible to raise their GPAs. This is not always the case, however, according to Tokay High School counselor John Hunt, who says that students can end up stretching themselves too thin and end up failing the AP classes.

“It’s all about what you can do well. I advise balance, and so does Stanford University. Someone loading up on AP classes might not be able to do well in their volunteer work or athletics,” says Hunt.

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      SEN. JOHN JASINSKI: GOP-led Legislature takes education funding seriously

      Sen. John Jasinski, R-Faribault, is the state senator for District 24, which includes most of Steele County, as well as portions of Dodge, Rice and Waseca counties. Reach him at sen.john.jasinski@senate.mn or 651-296-0284.

      Class of 2021 first to pilot revised courses for new core curriculum

      Background

      • The Academic Core Curriculum Committee (ACCC) was established in Fall 2013 and composed of 13 faculty members with a goal to change the current general education program, according Dr. Sharon Emerson-Stonnell, professor of mathematics and also served on the ACCC

      • Faculty Senate passed the curriculum in their monthly meeting on Nov. 3, which was then passed by the Board of Visitors in Dec.

      • Faculty Senate opted to vote via secret ballot rather than hand count, resulting in 22 approval votes, three disapproval votes and one abstention

      • Along with the approval came three new courses to be added: Citizenship (CTZN) 110, Symposium on the Common Good 410 (CTZN) and English Writing and Rhetoric (ENGL) 165, according to Emerson-Stonnell

      • The faculty senate unanimously approved the new policy for instruction and advising, the new policy of governance and the new policy of a Core Curriculum director in addition to the Core Curriculum

      • Dr. Melissa Rhoten, professor of analytical chemistry, was named the program director for Core Curriculum on March 15

      • Rhoten was selected through nominations by the Academic Chairs Council, according to Dr. Joan Neff, provost and vice president for academic affairs

      • Rhoten will work with the Registrar’s office and department chairs to coordinate the scheduling of the courses for the curriculum, according to Neff

      • “We are really excited to revise existing general education courses and to create new core courses that are consistent with the goals of the new program,” said Rhoten.

      How it will work

      • The curriculum will be composed of three levels: Foundations, Perspectives and Symposium that will replace the current 14 goal program, according to Emerson-Stonnell

      • Students may opt to count up to three core curriculum courses toward each major instead of none in the past, according to Emerson-Stonnell

      • CTZN 110 and ENGL 165 will both be required for students to take during their first year at Longwood

      • Rather than some majors requiring three semesters of a foreign language all majors will only require two semesters

      • “We have built into this program with every single course they take is either going to be speaking infused or writing infused with 10 percent to 15 percent of their grade is either going to be speaking or writing,” said Emerson-Stonnell

      Who will be affected

      • Fall 2017 the curriculum will go into effect with the freshman class as they may take one of the new pilot courses

      • Transfer students will be allowed to choose between the two programs, according to Emerson-Stonnell

      • Fall 2018, all freshmen students will be enrolled in the new Core Curriculum program

      Reactions

      “I am very excited about the change with the core curriculum. I think it gives us more opportunity to do more interdisciplinary work. I think it streamlines the process of a core we need to have,” Dr. Lissa Power-deFur, professor of communication sciences and disorders and also serves as a faculty representative to the Board of Visitors, told the Rotunda in Nov. 2016

      “It’s an absolutely beautiful program,” Dr. Jacqueline Hall, associate professor of mathematics, and who also serves on Faculty Senate told the Rotunda in Nov 2016.

      USC Upstate creates bachelor’s program in advanced manufacturing

      Upstate manufacturing professionals will soon have a new path to career success.

      The University of South Carolina Upstate said Thursday it will introduce a new two-year baccalaureate program aimed at helping individuals who have earned their Associate of Applied Science degrees in mechatronics build on their skills.

      Mechatronics is a multidisciplinary field that combines electronics and mechanical engineering.

      USC Upstate, based in Spartanburg, said the Bachelor of Applied Science degree in advanced manufacturing management’s objective is for graduates who have three to five years of manufacturing work experience to move into supervisory roles.

      The program will be introduced when the fall semester begins on Aug. 24, and is offered through the university’s division of natural science and engineering.

      “The program objectives will prepare graduates to assume organizational leadership roles, communicate with all levels of an organization, and solve complex problems that combine technical and nontechnical factors such as economics and societal impacts,” said Timothy Ellis, a USC Upstate instructor and the program’s coordinator.

      Basically, the program will teach employees certain skills they typically don’t learn in associate degree programs, or while working on a manufacturing line.

      The university said the curriculum includes 21 hours of major courses at USC Upstate, including manufacturing leadership I and II, manufacturing work practices, manufacturing quality, manufacturing project management, operational excellence, and senior seminar, which is similar to a thesis course.

      Students will be required to take 15 hours of upper levels courses, including 12 hours in business administration or other related courses, and three hours of an elective.

      Forty-two hours of mechatronics technical credits transferred from a technical college and 43 hours of general education courses taken at USC Upstate or transferred from another college are also required.

      The maximum transfer credits allowable are 76 hours, according to the university.

      USC Upstate said the program has been in the works since 2016. It is the result of the university’s collaboration with Upstate technical colleges and manufacturing companies.

      “Having highly skilled associates in mechatronics is important to the success of companies like BMW,” said Ryan Childers, department manager of student programs at Spartanburg County-based BMW Manufacturing Co. “However, solid leadership skills are also important. This degree will give technical professionals the tools to be more effective and have greater opportunity for advancement throughout their careers.”

      Laine Mears, Clemson University’s BMW SmartState chair of automotive manufacturing, said he believes USC Upstate’s program will benefit not only Upstate residents and manufacturing associates but also the state’s efforts to attract economic development.

      “I talk to a lot of industry folks,” Mears said. “No one is worried about technology. Their primary concern is not having qualified people. … Giving people some of those soft skills — mixing technical and nontechnical — is what we built [Clemson’s International Center for Automotive Research] on. It’s important to understand where your decisions fit within an organization. The old story is that everyone needs a bachelor’s degree right away. But there are plenty of opportunities out there. … The more pathways there are, the easier it will be for people to find their sweet spot. And the better it will be for industry in the Upstate.”

      Mears referenced a 2015 report by Deloitte Consulting and the Manufacturing Institute that forecasts nearly 3.5 million manufacturing jobs will be created in the U.S. by 2025. The study predicts at least 2 million of those jobs will be unfilled because of a lack of qualified candidates.

      “State schools have a duty to foster academic innovation to improve the economic climate,” Mears said. “The USC Upstate program is another splash of color in the painting we’re trying to create that will attract new industry to the region and South Carolina.”

      Johnnie-Lynn Crosby, regional director of business solutions at SC Works Greenville and Upstate, said the program and others that might follow could attract more people to careers in manufacturing.

      “I think it helps manufacturing in general, because it continues to chip away at that perception that manufacturing jobs are dirty and low-skill,” Crosby said. “That’s not the case anymore. There are plenty of opportunities out there.”

      For more information, call 864-503-5894, or email amm@uscupstate.edu.

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      MxCC opening enrollment Monday for classes in Meriden’s Platt High School – Meriden Record

      MERIDEN — Enrollment at the new Middlesex Community College center in Platt High School begins Monday. Officials say they are ready to begin a new chapter in the freshly renovated high school.

      “We’re really excited,” said Steven Minkler, academic dean and interim president of Middlesex Community College. “It’s terrific to have college programming in a high school and the opportunities it brings to students.”

      The one-year pilot program, branded as MxCC@Platt, will be open for registration from 3 to 6 p.m. Monday in the school’s media center. Middlesex administrators worked with Meriden School Superintendent Mark Benigni and Platt High School Principal Robert Montemurro to carve out a suitable location that would allow the college to maintain a city presence.


      After several years of budgetary setbacks, Middlesex was forced to close the Meriden Center at 55 W. Main St. last spring, forcing city students to find transportation to the Middletown campus, enroll at another school or drop out.

      Educators said the decision to open a branch in the high school will hopefully solve the problem and could provide educational opportunities for Meriden high school students and staff. In lieu of rent, five slots in each course will be reserved for high school students and staff eligible to take college courses. The college will provide its own security.

      Montemurro reserved 10 classes near the school’s media center and an office and computer space in the media center for college use. The remainder of the high school will be cut off to the college students. Classes will run from 3:30 to 8:30 p.m. after the last high school bell has rung and students have exited the building.


      The college will bring textbooks, laptops and other supplies to the high school campus. It will also offer tutoring assistance, academic advising, student services and online library resources. Montemurro has set aside a large office space for faculty and student meetings. About 25 college faculty will work at the new center, Minkler said.

      The 2017 fall schedule in Meriden offers more than 50 course selections from the general education curriculum, including English, freshman seminar, history, mathematics, music appreciation, psychology and sociology. The new location also allows MxCC to offer science courses in the school’s new classroom laboratories, something it was unable to do at its downtown campus.

      The completion of renovations at Platt frees up the media center for other uses after school.

      “This was our hub without an auditorium and a gym,” Montemurro said of the media center. “We had parent meetings here and other events. But now we have the best auditorium ever.”

      The limited hours may reduce enrollment at MxCC’s Meriden campus in Platt, but Winkler said it could be as many as 500 students. Platt will also house the Saturday enrichment program for middle school students in the city.

      Dean of Students Adrienne Maslin will be the administrator in charge at MxCC@Platt until a permanent evening coordinator is hired, Minkler said.




      Grant aids colleges’ curriculum

      Lyndon and Johnson state colleges will unite next year as Northern Vermont University, and they’ve received a $224,646 grant over three years to help figure out how to reload their curriculums.

      The money comes from the Davis Educational Foundation in Yarmouth, Maine.

      To prepare for unification, faculty members have been revamping the two colleges’ general education requirements — required courses that are outside students’ majors — so there’s one program for both campuses. These courses come under the heading: What should an educated American know?

      While the colleges will maintain separate campuses after they unify, both will be part of a single new university, and students at either location should have similar opportunities.

      The grant will help the effort “to refresh our curriculum, ensuring that our general education offerings are relevant for current student needs,” says President Elaine Collins, who is now president of both Lyndon State and Johnson State and will become the president of Northern Vermont University when it comes into being next July 1.

      The revised curriculum will focus more on critical thinking and problem-solving.

      “The emphasis is on developing those habits of thinking, rather than memorizing a lot of information,” says Sharon Twigg, Johnson associate professor/chair of the writing and literature department, who leads the initiative.

      “We’re trying to make the general education program more exciting to students by including courses with more high-impact, hands-on learning,” Twigg said. “It will provide them with a basic set of skills they need to do well in their major and to do well as they move on from college.”

      One idea being discussed for juniors or seniors is two linked, upper-level courses that address a pressing issue such as climate change. The curriculum could also include such hands-on opportunities as work in the community, internships and project-based learning like a performance or research paper.

      “It’s a lot more engaging for everyone to have students running the show a little more,” Twigg says. “Engagement is really important because we want students to stay in college and succeed. This is one program we hope will help with that.”

      “Our goal is to build a program students will be enthusiastic about that makes an impact on their lives in a meaningful way,” said Nolan Atkins, who’s now the provost of the two schools. “The guiding question that is the focus of the new program is: How can I make a positive impact in the world? The program will help students answer this question.”

      The grant also will fund professional development opportunities for faculty.

      The revised curriculum will be presented to faculty members at both colleges for feedback and ultimately approval.

      The Davis Educational Foundation was established by Stanton and Elisabeth Davis after he retired as chairman of Shaw’s Supermarkets Inc.