Explore your options, but know the cost

One of the many assets that universities in the U.S have to offer is the ability to pick and choose exactly what you want to study. The curriculum is designed, or rather marketed, in a way that promises students that they don’t have to know what they are doing and have the luxury of changing their major even as late as sophomore year. For example, AU requires that students complete general education courses before selecting a major. Many majors are also small enough or overlap with other courses of study, granting students leeway to explore their interests.

Unfortunately, however, these naive explorations do not always end with a pot of gold, but rather, as in my case, a grade point average that is much below what I thought I would have and a misrepresentation of my academic abilities and reputation as a student.

When I decided I wanted to major in journalism, it was largely fueled by the fact that I knew, if there was one thing in this world I was good at, it was writing. When I said that my first semester of college, it sounded like a humble brag. Now, as I enter my junior year, I am beginning to realize that I might just be a one-trick pony. I originally wanted to double major in economics, a subject I was passionate about and understood. Having taken the subject in high school, I confidently registered for microeconomics, knowing that it would be an easy A. The first exam did not go well, which left me confused. I decided to read the textbook diligently and went over the exam material with my peers. I walked out of the second exam with a smile on my face—a short-lived smile on my face. Although only a miracle would be able to change my final grade, I did everything I could to study for my final exam. I used AU’s freshman forgiveness policy for microeconomics, vowing to myself that I would pick my classes and professors more wisely and not make a stupid mistake that would affect my GPA again.

Except now, I was faced with a dilemma. What would my second major or minor be? I was a sophomore now, yet I didn’t know exactly what I wanted to study. That is, until I took a business class to fulfill a general education credit and realized that this was something I might want to pursue. I researched AU’s business degree, concluding that this seemed like something I would really enjoy. I decided to take up a minor in business, something that would give me a broad overview of the business world and a potential backup plan. I also realized I had enough space in my schedule for another minor (but not a major) and decided that international service would probably compliment my actual major the best.

I was excited to finally have my majors and minors and life together. I would have a diverse set of classes. It would be the exposure that journalism students need to make it, right?

That is, if you’re good at the subjects. My business minor required I take basic statistics and financial accounting. Both were math-based and had devastating results on my GPA. It seemed impossible to juggle all my classes, extracurriculars and social life when these two classes alone seemed like they were akin to carrying a 15-credit workload. I found myself crumbling under the pressure.

The very thing that made the American college system so desirable and interesting left me with a weak GPA.

With all the academic freedom that the American higher education system provides, we do not know what to do with all it. We often do not know where to go for help and advice. Being in a new community means that you are the only one who really knows what your strengths and weaknesses are, at least while you’re a freshman. I was bad at math and I knew it, but I still took a chance and overestimated myself. I was in denial about lacking economic talent so I retook the class, eventually taking even more economics classes.

While academic advisors are at our disposal, they are only trained to know their particular school well and don’t really know what to tell students about other subjects. In my experience, it creates a sharp divide between the two majors that I would ideally like to meld together. That being said, I think that it is imperative for schools to create solutions to this issue. For example, schools could create programs where students can take quizzes or read over a basic syllabus before signing up for a class. Academic Advisors should be able to help students get a better grasp of courses and provide a better explanation of what a skills students’ need to excel. Furthermore, students should be allowed to drop a class when they please, without negative consequences like a “W” on their transcript– a system that universities like the University of California, Los Angeles have. For me, my issue was simply with figuring out what I wanted to do other than my main degree. Students who don’t know what they want to major in could spend several semesters just trying out various classes and like me, find out the hard way that they aren’t cut out for some subjects, or they might spend too long testing different classes and end up with no space for failure. There is no simple solution for this problem, but guidance and a better way to try out classes would help students who are facing similar dilemmas.

sloganathan@theeagleonline.com


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Email mmccain@circlevilleherald.com.

Educational Malpractice

In an appearance on a recent episode of Wes Moore’s “Future City” podcast on education technology, Moore asked me about online education and its potential to be “more democratic,” allowing underserved and underesourced students access to educational opportunities. 

I said that in the absence of other opportunities, something online is better than nothing at all. (I said a bunch of other stuff too. It’s around 14:45 into the recording.) I also said as an educational experience, those online credentials are vastly inferior, but still, doesn’t something have to be better than nothing?

I’m wondering about that now. I’m wondering because I’ve had the opportunity to review the English 101 curriculum at StraighterLine, an online education provider whose “on demand general education courses” are guaranteed to transfer for college credit to over 100 partnering institutions, one of which is McNeese St. University in Lake Charles, LA, where I taught English 101 from 1994-97 as a graduate student. 

Students can now avoid the English 101 requirement by completing the StraighterLine equivalent for $79 (once you’ve signed up for the monthly membership of $99).[1] 

Should they?

I suppose it depends on what one values, an education, or a relatively cheap and easy path toward a credential.

Even with the membership sign up, English 101 on StraighterLine will only cost you $178 for the course. At my local community college (Trident Tech), cost per credit hour is $184, so a 3-hour English 101 course will cost you $552.  At SOWELA Tech, the closest 2-year school to McNeese St., the course would be $846. At McNeese, 3 hours of credit as a part time student is just over $1,000.

But based on a review of the course syllabus and engaging with the free trial, if the goal is an experience that takes advantage of even a fraction of what is known about effective approaches to developing as a writer, StraighterLine is educational malpractice.

At StraighterLine, English 101 uses a “modes” approach to composition, teaching different forms such as narrative and compare and contrast essays. Coincidentally (or maybe not), we used the same curriculum when I started at McNeese St. in 1994.

It was out of date even then.

More troubling is the sequencing of the material. The first lesson, which must be completed before trying any other lesson, is on “plagiarism,” and features a link to the very useful (as a reference) Purdue Online Writing Lab (OWL) as well as a short slide presentation on the StraighterLine philosophy toward plagiarism, including a warning that those who are found guilty of an offense being informed they will fail the course.

The second unit is titled, “Proper Grammar: Friend or Foe?” If you are curious as to how proper grammar could be a “foe,” I join your confusion.

Similar to the plagiarism lesson, there is a slide deck presentation with audio narration that sounds like it was recorded by a human attempting to sound like a computer, which is attempting to sound like a human. The introduction to comma use has this tidbit, “To talk, you have to breathe – although most teenage girls are able to stretch this rule to the limit. The comma replaces that breath in your writing, but where and when to use it can be confusing.”

I’m troubled by this material for several reasons beyond the casual sexism in the above statement.

For one, regarding plagiarism and source use, we know that it is better to teach students a holistic view of sources and sourcing rather than a list of decontextualized rules. For two, in an effort to make it easier to follow and enforce those rules, they give bad advice.

The plagiarism unit quiz has the following question:

“True or False: If research is not required for an essay, you should avoid research so you can avoid the temptation to take ideas from others.”

Because I was a lousy StraighterLine student and didn’t view the slides first, I got this wrong. I answered “false.” The StraighterLine answer is “true.”

But oh, how I need people to understand that if the goal is to help students truly learn to write, the answer must be false. Writing is for audiences. Writing is to engage the world. Even if we are writing something in which sources may not be directly cited, the idea that we should wall ourselves off from possible sources of inspiration or edification in order to avoid “plagiarism” is nutso cuckoo.

But those values are not at play in the StraighterLine course.

Being exposed to a gestalt that helps students better understand and engage with writing in different contexts is subsumed to that more direct path to a credential.

Honestly, thinking about students being exposed to this material made me sad.

The grammar and commas lessons are rote and also without context, a technique that has been discredited since the 1950’s. More sad making.

StraighterLine does require the completion of actual writing assignments in addition to the quizzes that accompany each unit. Those writing assignments are read by “tutors” who provide feedback. I’m not spending $178 just to see what kind of feedback an assignment receives, so I can’t comment on that part of the course, though it appears for the less expensive option, you can’t necessarily expect the same “tutor” to read each attempt.

On the plus side, there is some attention to the writing process, though this appears to be assessed by a quiz of the “What are the steps in the writing process?” variety, rather than an instructor examining the student work and commenting on where issues with process may be evident in the writing and discussing future approaches.

StraighterLine’s deficiencies are not inherent to the Internet and writing instruction. Writing can absolutely be taught effectively over the internet, though those who have done it will tell you it is every bit as time consuming and demanding as teaching writing face-to-face. A more up-to-date curriculum could be designed. Better lessons and approaches exist, and most of all, it could be staffed by an instructor who will engage with the same students over an extended period of time, giving deep personalized attention to each, but there is no incentive for StraighterLine to adapt or improve curriculum as long as students are enrolling and their partner institutions continue to give transfer credit. They are fulfilling every bit of their mission.

StraigherLine is the logical extension of credentialism, and is a prime example of Tressie McMillian Cottom’s “LowerEd,” a bargain basement experience that passes muster for credit at for-profit institutions interested in efficiency, or non-profit public institutions (like McNeese St.) that are perpetually strapped for resources. StraighterLine is no scam. In this category, they’re one of the good ones. They deliver exactly what they promise, which is the problem.

Perhaps it plays a necessary role for those who are held back from advancement for lack of a credential, but let’s not kid ourselves that it has much to do with education.

“Solutions” like StraighterLine will only exacerbate the gaps between those who have access to face-to-face education and those who don’t.

To that end, it fits the legacy of much of educational technology. If you are among the have’s, you get to use technology as a tool. If you are among the have nots, you must subsume yourself to the technology.

If this is the future of education, if this is the only education available to people because of cost or other issues of access, we’re in a lot of trouble.

ENROLLMENT BOOM: One ISU college gaining rather than losing students

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10 Easiest General Education Courses For Undergrads

So you are an undergrad and want to find out the easiest general education courses for undergrads. Education is inevitable in these days. If you are well educated you can get much better jobs and can lead a life that you wish. So it is worth reading Insider Monkey’s article that recently published.

Pixabay/Public Domain

As there is a fierce competition in the labor market you will have better chances at a job interview if you in-walk with a degree in your hand. Of course it’s not always true as nepotism exists everywhere in the world. It can easily happen that you are not hired just because of someone’s relative is. But generally speaking if you have a degree you can have better a better job with higher salary. Choosing the right courses isn’t easy, since you need to consider what you are good at, while what are the fields you can make more money. But what is true, Insider Monkey’s article can help you what to pick up.

Now without a further ado let’s see what Insider Monkey has investigated for us. We have picked three courses from their list.

The first one for now is Religion. Being a theologian I must admit it doesn’t belong to the best paying jobs, but it’s incredibly interesting. So if you are interested in religions it may be your field. You don’t have to be religious to pick this course. One of the easiest courses you can take if you want to spare yourself the trouble of studying hard for a grade is Religion. According to the data we used in this article, there had been 77 A’s in Religion in LA in the period between 2012-2015.

The next one is Italian-Early Modern Italy. I think almost everybody loves this beautiful language, if you too, you will enjoy this course. Consider taking Early Modern Italy as according to the statistics and a total of 78 A’s, you have a possibility to get a very high grade. If you’ve always wanted to learn more about Italy, this a great way to combine learning and boosting your GPA. When I started to learn Italian I grew to love everything in connection with it: people, culture, traditions, meals, music, dance, literature. It was a great investment for me to learn Italian. Perhaps it will be for you, too. Who knows?

For any further interesting information read Insider Monkey’s article about 10 easiest general education courses for undergrads

Hill Takes Reins of University Studies Program

Dr. Hamner Hill, chair of the Department of Political Science, Philosophy and Religion at Southeast Missouri State University, has been named the new director of the University Studies program at Southeast Missouri State University.

Hill replaces Dr. Wayne Bowen, who left Southeast this summer to take a new position at the University of Central Florida in Orlando. Hill is responsible for guiding the ongoing development of the University Studies program as part of Southeast’s priorities to improve retention and degree completion.

Hill has served at Southeast since 1986 where he is also a professor of philosophy and religion. His research interests are in philosophy of law and social/political philosophy, applied ethics and symbolic logic. He holds doctoral and master’s degrees from Washington University, a law degree from Marshall-Wythe School of Law and a Bachelor of Arts from the College of William and Mary.

Hill said he chose Southeast over other tenure track job offers because of Southeast’s University Studies program.

“I am deeply committed to the idea of general education/liberal arts and its role in public higher education,” he said. “One part of the mission of public colleges and universities is to help prepare students to participate more effectively as citizens. University Studies (general education) is essential to addressing this part of our mission. We seek to help students gain the knowledge, skills, and habits of mind needed to be effective citizens in a complex society.”

Dr. Karl Kunkel, Southeast provost, said, “I am very pleased that Hamner Hill accepted my offer to become the next director of University Studies. Dr. Hill has a long history as a member of the philosophy faculty and department chair at Southeast.  During conversations I’ve had with him, he clearly understands the societal need for generally educated persons in a vibrant democracy balanced with the role of University Studies preparing students with the basic skills and perspectives necessary for successful careers.

“Hamner is excellent at working with others to build consensus,” Kunkel continued, “which is vital at this point when we are examining and revising our University Studies program while also conforming with the state-level transfer matrix stipulated by Missouri law.”

Challenges for this year, Hill said, are to address new state legislative requirements concerning general education and transfer of credits between public institutions in Missouri.  In June 2016, then Gov. Jay Nixon signed into law Senate Bill 997, which requires Missouri’s two- and four-year public colleges and universities to collaborate on a 42-credit hour general education equivalency matrix, so courses taken anywhere within this system will count if a student transfers. This change was intended to make transferring general education credits between institutions simpler and more consistent for students, as well as more predictable for schools.

“All of the state two- and four-year public institutions are working towards a consistent, fully transferable general education block,” he said. “That is our biggest challenge for the year.”

Noam Chomsky joins UA as laureate professor in linguistics …

The University of Arizona announced the addition of renowned linguist and social critic Noam Chomsky to their faculty at the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences Aug 17.

In an email to faculty and staff, UA President Robert C. Robbins praised the addition of Chomsky, the most cited living author, to the university.

“Having a scholar of Dr. Chomsky’s caliber on our campus presents a tremendous opportunity for our students, faculty and staff, and truly speaks to the greatness of this university,” Robbins wrote.

Robbins listed Chomsky’s many accomplishments.

“Not only is Dr. Chomsky’s expertise in linguistics unmatched, he has also had incredible impact in the fields of cognitive science, philosophy, psychology, computer science, mathematics, childhood education and anthropology,” Robbins wrote. “He is also well known for his political commentary, and having him here will add to the diversity of thought and opinion we seek to foster on our campus.”

Chomsky, who taught a general education course “What Is Politics?” last semester, has regularly lectured on campus since his first appearance in 2012.

RELATED: New honors college dean aims to bring program to new heights

According to John Paul Jones III, Dean of the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, 6,000 people showed up to Centennial Hall, which only holds 2,500 people, to hear Chomsky’s lecture on higher education in 2012.

“After that lecture, I realized the tremendous interest in Chomsky among UA students and the Tucson community,” Jones said.

Drawn back to UA by strong connections in the Department of Linguistics, Chomsky will assume his part-time position as laureate professor in the Department of Linguistics this semester and begin teaching regularly in the spring semester.

“Chomsky established modern linguistics, He’s an awe-inspiring thinker,” Natasha Warner, head of the Department of Linguistics, told UANews.

“The opportunity for UA linguistics students to learn from him on a regular basis is simply astounding. I am especially excited about the opportunity for undergraduates to learn about language and linguistics from him,” Warner said.

Chomsky was also named Agnese Nelms Haury Chair in the Agnese Nelms Haury Program in Environment and Social Justice, a UA Foundation endowment program and the prime contributor to Chomsky’s salary.His spring course, What is Politics?, was attended by 550 individuals, half of which came from UA’s humanities seminar program with over 90 percent of the politically diverse participants saying they would retake the course, according to Jones.

“Student love learning from him,” Jones said.

While Chomsky will be an available resource for graduate students and may teach modules of graduate student courses, Chomsky has expressed a real interest and excitement to teach and engage with undergraduates on campus.

RELATED: Iconic linguist Noam Chomsky to co-teach political course spring 2017

“We felt that the UA would be a good place to work and think and interact with people we like and can work with,” Chomsky told UANews. “We fell in love with Tucson — the mountains, the desert, Tucson has an atmosphere that is peaceful and manageable.”

Next fall, Chomsky plans to teach a history of linguistics course, providing students a unique experience to learn from someone “who was there” throughout the development of the field he helped pioneer, Jones said.

“Twenty years from now, former undergraduates will be sitting around a table and someone will mention Noam Chomsky. A Wildcat will be able ‘Oh I took a class from him when I was an undergraduate,’ and they will think that is impossible, but not for a UA student.”

Chomsky’s impact reaches from his development of the algorithm “context-free grammar” found in many computers today to his commentary on current political affairs.

He has published over 100 books – beyond the seven biographies published on him – and regularly appears in the media.

Chomsky has been awarded the Kyoto Prize in Basic Sciences, the Helmholtz Medal and the Ben Franklin Medal in Computer and Cognitive Science, among other awards.

A true public intellectual, Chomsky is one of the many draws UA can offer to student, Jones said.

Chomsky will continue to hold public lectures on campus for the broader community.


Follow Randall Eck on Twitter.


Noam Chomsky joins UA as laureate professor in linguistics department

The University of Arizona announced the addition of renowned linguist and social critic Noam Chomsky to their faculty at the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences Aug 17.

In an email to faculty and staff, UA President Robert C. Robbins praised the addition of Chomsky, the most cited living author, to the university.

“Having a scholar of Dr. Chomsky’s caliber on our campus presents a tremendous opportunity for our students, faculty and staff, and truly speaks to the greatness of this university,” Robbins wrote.

Robbins listed Chomsky’s many accomplishments.

“Not only is Dr. Chomsky’s expertise in linguistics unmatched, he has also had incredible impact in the fields of cognitive science, philosophy, psychology, computer science, mathematics, childhood education and anthropology,” Robbins wrote. “He is also well known for his political commentary, and having him here will add to the diversity of thought and opinion we seek to foster on our campus.”

Chomsky, who taught a general education course “What Is Politics?” last semester, has regularly lectured on campus since his first appearance in 2012.

RELATED: New honors college dean aims to bring program to new heights

According to John Paul Jones III, Dean of the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, 6,000 people showed up to Centennial Hall, which only holds 2,500 people, to hear Chomsky’s lecture on higher education in 2012.

“After that lecture, I realized the tremendous interest in Chomsky among UA students and the Tucson community,” Jones said.

Drawn back to UA by strong connections in the Department of Linguistics, Chomsky will assume his part-time position as laureate professor in the Department of Linguistics this semester and begin teaching regularly in the spring semester.

“Chomsky established modern linguistics, He’s an awe-inspiring thinker,” Natasha Warner, head of the Department of Linguistics, told UANews.

“The opportunity for UA linguistics students to learn from him on a regular basis is simply astounding. I am especially excited about the opportunity for undergraduates to learn about language and linguistics from him,” Warner said.

Chomsky was also named Agnese Nelms Haury Chair in the Agnese Nelms Haury Program in Environment and Social Justice, a UA Foundation endowment program and the prime contributor to Chomsky’s salary.His spring course, What is Politics?, was attended by 550 individuals, half of which came from UA’s humanities seminar program with over 90 percent of the politically diverse participants saying they would retake the course, according to Jones.

“Student love learning from him,” Jones said.

While Chomsky will be an available resource for graduate students and may teach modules of graduate student courses, Chomsky has expressed a real interest and excitement to teach and engage with undergraduates on campus.

RELATED: Iconic linguist Noam Chomsky to co-teach political course spring 2017

“We felt that the UA would be a good place to work and think and interact with people we like and can work with,” Chomsky told UANews. “We fell in love with Tucson — the mountains, the desert, Tucson has an atmosphere that is peaceful and manageable.”

Next fall, Chomsky plans to teach a history of linguistics course, providing students a unique experience to learn from someone “who was there” throughout the development of the field he helped pioneer, Jones said.

“Twenty years from now, former undergraduates will be sitting around a table and someone will mention Noam Chomsky. A Wildcat will be able ‘Oh I took a class from him when I was an undergraduate,’ and they will think that is impossible, but not for a UA student.”

Chomsky’s impact reaches from his development of the algorithm “context-free grammar” found in many computers today to his commentary on current political affairs.

He has published over 100 books – beyond the seven biographies published on him – and regularly appears in the media.

Chomsky has been awarded the Kyoto Prize in Basic Sciences, the Helmholtz Medal and the Ben Franklin Medal in Computer and Cognitive Science, among other awards.

A true public intellectual, Chomsky is one of the many draws UA can offer to student, Jones said.

Chomsky will continue to hold public lectures on campus for the broader community.


Follow Randall Eck on Twitter.


Two cut degree programs could make a comeback

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Take a look at the new $75 million Southside High School. It’s Lafayette Parish’s newest high school by more than 40 years.
David D’Aquin / Scott Clause USA TODAY NETWORK

Some degree programs cut in recent years could be making a comeback if the Louisiana Board of Regents approves proposals Wednesday.

The board and its Academic and Student Affairs Committee will consider several program proposals, including two to reinstate a bachelor’s in chemistry at University of Louisiana at Monroe and the nursing program to Grambling State.

ULM’s bachelor’s in chemistry was terminated in 2011 because of low and declining numbers of completers — 18 majors with an average of three completers, according to the proposal.

MORE: Take a look at college VPs’ salaries | How to get colleges to collaborate: ‘It’s the money that talks’

The redesigned program includes three new concentrations — biochemistry, forensics and medicinal chemistry — plus the traditional chemistry degree path. Faculty also have made recruitment and retention plans for the program, according to the proposal.

Grambling’s undergraduate nursing program was closed in December 2015 after losing conditional approval from the Louisiana State Board of Nursing, a state of exigency and years of struggling to maintain passing grades for the state-required nursing exam.

When Rick Gallot assumed the presidency in August 2016, he said reestablishing the nursing program would be a priority.

The Board of Regents approved the letter of intent in April. The nursing board approved it and a feasibility study in June.

If Regents approves on Wednesday, Grambling can begin hiring a director and faculty, developing the program and implementation plan, and writing admission policies and a student handbook.

Estimated cost for the program is $4.2 million for the first five years, including salaries, equipment, faculty development, accreditation and supplies. The school expects to offset this through tuition and fees, Title III grants, GSU-generated funds and formula appropriations, according to the proposal.

MORE: What is the ‘least educated’ region in Louisiana? | Higher ed depends on data — and the people who decipher it

Other proposals and letters of intent to be considered are for degrees in everything from diagnostic medical sonography to earth and energy sciences.

Letters of intent to be considered are:

  • Doctor of Occupational Therapy at LSU Health Sciences Center in Shreveport

The doctoral program would replace the existing master’s in occupational therapy at LSUHSC-S to better meet the “increasing need for advanced-practitioner preparation,” according to the school’s letter of intent.

Because it would replace an existing program, many of the resources needed for the program already are in place, including five faculty. Two more faculty would be needed in the transition, along with an additional part-time administrative assistant to assist with the placement of students for the doctoral internship, according to the letter.

  • Doctor of Physical Therapy at University of Louisiana at Monroe

ULM currently has a pre-PT undergraduate concentration under its bachelor’s in kinesiology. Both branches of the LSU Health Sciences Center have Doctor of Physical Therapy programs, and many who apply are not admitted, according to admission data included in ULM’s letter of intent.

ULM anticipates enrolling 30 students initially. It will need to hire new personnel, including “at a minimum” a program director, clinical director, five additional faculty members and an administrative assistant, over the course of the first four years.

Existing facilities are to be renovated, and new research and instructional equipment would be purchased. ULM anticipates expenditures for the first year to be $973,000 with expected increases to $1.1 million by year five, according to the school’s letter of intent.

The university is seeking private investments to help cover costs, especially during the first year when no students will be enrolled and neither state appropriations nor self-generated revenue from tuition and fees will be produced, according to the letter.

  • Doctorate in earth and energy sciences at University of Louisiana at Lafayette

“An academic program in earth and energy sciences is an interdisciplinary degree program that studies and explores energy and environmental challenges of today and the future,” according to the school’s letter of intent.

This program would integrate geology and environmental science with chemistry and physics. Current infrastructure for the undergraduate and master’s programs can support such a doctorate. No additional space for research or classrooms or additional faculty and staff are required.

The primary cost of the program would be seven graduate teaching assistantships, which is expected to be offset by tuition and fees.

  • Master of Science in athletic training at Louisiana State University

Academic proposals on the agenda include:

  • Associate of Applied Science in diagnostic medical sonography at LSU Eunice

This would replace an existing Certificate of Applied Science program. Courses cover general education and diagnostic medical sonography.

Support would come through Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education grant funding being applied to nursing and allied health programs. This funding and tuition are expected cover faculty salaries and other costs of the program, according to the proposal.

  • Associate of Applied Science in surgical technology at LSUE and Sowela Technical Community College

Both schools are seeking approval for individual programs. Their respective Board of Supervisors approved both proposals, now forwarded to Regents.

The schools are working with Regents’ staff and each other to address issues regarding duplication and need, according to the proposal.

Surgical technologists assist in surgery, prepare operating rooms and arrange equipment.

Neither LSUE nor Sowela has faculty in place to teach the surgical technology courses, but if the programs are approved, faculty members and adjuncts will be hired, according to the proposal.

  • Post master’s certificate in psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner at Northwestern State University

The proposed certificate would allow registered nurses holding a Master of Science in nursing to obtain additional certification and licensure to provide mental health services to prevent or treat psychiatric disorders.

The program would be delivered as a hybrid with didactic classes available online, according to the proposal.

The University of Louisiana Board of Supervisors approved the proposal in June, sending it forward to Regents.

  • Graduate certificate in instructional coaching at LSU
  • Bachelor of Science in educational studies at Southern University of New Orleans

The Board of Regents and its committees meet beginning at 9 a.m. Wednesday in Baton Rouge.

Plymouth: Massasoit, CCCC Begin Partnership with Aviation Mechanics School – 95.9 WATD

ply airport

Cape Cod Community College President Dr. John Cox (L) and Massasoit Community College President Dr. Charles Wall

 

In Plymouth, it’s signed, sealed and delivered and ready for take-off—that’s the partnership agreement that was signed at Plymouth Airport’s aviation mechanics school on Friday–now sponsored by both Cape Cod and Massasoit Community Colleges.

This agreement will allow students at Massasoit to take the required general education courses at their home campus—then—transfer into the Cape Cod Community College FAA certified aviation maintenance program.

Massasoit’s President Dr. Charles Wall says it’s a great opportunity for students.

“The jobs are there. The skills are needed and we knew it was a good fit for our two colleges and most important for the students here—opportunity!” said Wall.

And, Cape Cod Community College President Dr. John Cox says there’s already evidence of that with the success of the first graduating class.

“The first cohort will complete in October—and as they complete they’re then taking their FAA certification for the final piece,” said Cox. “And, I believe there are 19 students in that cohort. We have three that currently have standing job offers and they’re not done with the program and they haven’t tested for their final FAA certification.”

This specialized hands on training program is one of only six in the country with such an intensive training model.


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