Sanctuary Cities: Justice Department Outlines Grant Cuts | Time.com

President Trump has called for certain federal grants to be withheld from cities that do not report undocumented immigrants to federal authorities, known as “sanctuary cities.”

But the standoff may cost the cities less money than originally thought.

On Friday, the Department of Justice sent letters to nine jurisdictions citing specific types of grants that may be cut, many of which are directly related to law enforcement.

Each of the nine letters, which went to the state of California and major cities like New York and Chicago, cited a specific grant that compels them to work with federal authorities on immigration violations. “Failure to comply with this condition could result in the withholding of grant funds” or “suspension or termination of the grant,” the letter warned.

But a TIME examination of the eight grants cited in the letters — one of which is repeated in letters to the city of Chicago and the surrounding Cook County — found that many do not come with large price tags by government standards.

Each grant lists, in general terms, how the locality will use the money. Chicago, for example, stated in 2016 that it would use the funds “to purchase equipment and support overtime patrols. The project goal is to increase essential law enforcement services.”

The Chicago grant is one of 1,010 outlays known as “Byrne JAG” grants that were issued to localities in fiscal year 2016. Another 56 were issued to states, for a total of $264 million. But threats to withhold these grants, which date back to the Obama Administration, appear to contradict Trump’s executive order to spare grants which are “necessary for law enforcement purposes.”

At the same time, many legal scholars argue that it is unconstitutional to dangle any other type of federal grant as a condition for compliance with a matter of law enforcement, in large part thanks to Chief Justice John Roberts’ opinion on the Affordable Care Act case. As constitutional law scholar Noah Feldman noted, Roberts concluded that “Congress can’t create a funding condition that is unrelated to the original funding purpose.” In other words, it might be difficult for the Justice Department to make receiving education grants dependent on whether a city reports undocumented immigrants to federal authorities.

Instead, some experts surmise, what could be at stake are other grants issued by the Justice Department that are less explicitly related to law enforcement. For example, there are 25 programs issued by the department’s Office on Violence Against Women and others devoted to juvenile justice and delinquency prevention. While no official in the Trump administration has specifically cited these programs, last week’s letters state that failure to comply with federal immigration law could make states and localities ineligible for all grants from the Office of Justice Programs, which oversees both law enforcement grants and those like the ones mentioned above.

Should sanctuary cities choose not to comply, many predict a protracted legal battle before a single dollar is withheld from a grant, many of which are determined by formulas and aren’t otherwise subject to discretion. In the interim, it remains unclear exactly which programs the Trump Administration is willing to attempt to deny cities that do not cooperate.

Federal grant to fight heroin epidemic – Story | WeAreCenralPA

Federal grant to fight heroin epidemicCopyright 2017 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.





Harrisburg, Dauphin County, Pa. – Governor Wolf announced that Pennsylvania secured a $26.5 million federal grant to combat the heroin and opioid epidemic. The departments of Aging, Drug and Alcohol Programs, Health, and Human Services jointly filed the successful grant application that will increase access to treatment, reduce unmet treatment need, and reduce opioid overdose related deaths through the provision of prevention, treatment, and recovery activities for opioid use disorder (OUD).

“The scourge that is heroin and opioid abuse must be attacked and this significant influx of federal dollars will help us in our fight,” Governor Wolf said. “We are combatting this crisis head on; that’s why I’ve made Cures Act funding an integral part of my 2017-18 budget, so we can focus dollars where they are needed – to expand access to treatment services. This important funding will build upon my administration’s extensive efforts to combat this epidemic.”

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded the grant, which was funded by the 21st Century Cures Act, signed into law by President Obama in December 2016. The $1 billion grant over the next two years is to help combat the heroin and opioid epidemic in all 50 states. Pennsylvania received the fourth-largest grant award, behind California, Texas, and Florida.

The Cures Act grant announcement is phase one of two and totals $485 million. States can use the federal grants to improve prescription drug monitoring programs, implement prevention activities, and train health care providers on overdose prevention and recognizing potential cases of substance abuse.

“This funding is critical for Pennsylvania,” said Jennifer Smith, Acting Secretary, Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs. “Families continue to be ravaged by the disease of addiction and we must stop the momentum of this epidemic.

“These funds will initially be used to identify gaps in treatment services and locations where there are capacity shortages. The grant will enhance prevention efforts and raise awareness of the disease and ways to find help.”

 Funding will support a comprehensive array of prevention, treatment, and recovery services depending on the needs of recipients. States and territories were awarded funds based on rates of overdose deaths and unmet need for heroin and opioid addiction treatment.

“Pennsylvania loses 10 people a day to this epidemic. Each one is someone’s family member, neighbor, colleague, and friend,” said Department of Human Services Secretary Ted Dallas. “This funding will help the Wolf Administration continue to address the issue comprehensively through prevention, education, and treatment.” 

 The project will support a comprehensive response to the heroin and opioid epidemic using a strategic planning process to conduct needs and capacity assessments. The results of the assessments will identify gaps and resources from which to build upon existing substance use prevention and treatment activities.

-The commonwealth’s initial strategies have been developed and will include:

-Provide clinically appropriate treatment services to 6,000 individuals who are uninsured or underinsured.

-Expand treatment capacity for Medication Assisted Treatment for OUD.

-Expand treatment capacity for underserved populations by targeted workforce development and cultural competency training.

-Improve quality of prescribing practices through prescriber education.

-Increase community awareness of OUD issues and resources through public awareness activities.

-Expand implementation of warm hand-off referral practices to increase the number of patients transferred directly from the emergency department to substance use treatment.

-Increase the number of youth receiving evidence-based prevention and life skills education programs.

-Improve identification and referral of students for assessment and treatment by providing training to school personnel.

-Expand Pennsylvania’s integration of its Prescription Drug Monitoring Program data at the point-of-care, promoting ease-of-use of this data in clinical decision-making.

 “The Cures Act funding will be crucial in our fight against Pennsylvania’s opioid epidemic,” Department of Health Secretary Murphy said. “This funding will provide an opportunity for the commonwealth to enhance the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program, providing physicians with the ability to monitor and control the overprescribing of opioids and help identify those who are in need of treatment.”

 “Substance use disorder, particularly relating to prescription drugs, among adults age 60 and older is one of the fastest growing health problems facing the country, yet it remains under-identified, under-diagnosed, and under-treated,” said Secretary of Aging Teresa Osborne.  “Securing this federal grant will enable the Wolf Administration to further strengthen its efforts to identify, treat, and provide a pathway to recovery across the lifespan.”

 In 2015, there were over 33,000 heroin and opioid deaths in the United States; 3,500 of those occurred in Pennsylvania.

Faculty Senate pushes for admission to federal grant program | The … – Texas State University


A Texas State University Faculty Senate meeting Feb. 8. Photo by: Jennifer Chacon | Staff Photographer

The Faculty Senate is creating an application to bring the McNair Program, a federal program providing funds and other resources to disadvantaged students wishing to pursue graduate studies, to the university.

The McNair Program is a discretionary, competitive grant which offers advancement through research and other scholarly opportunities geared toward earning a Ph.D.

“We’ve got a variety of academic support offerings already for students of different concentrations that are funded through this funding mechanism,” said Dr. Elizabeth Bishop, faculty senate member. “However, we don’t have the McNair (program), and the McNair is like the jewel in the crown.”

The McNair Program is part of the federal TRIO programs designed and supported by the U.S. Department of Education, and encourages the success of underrepresented individuals at post-secondary programs with the ultimate goal of earning a Ph.D.

“(The program) is about education and social transformation,” Bishop said. “It gives us a chance to prove the quality of what we’re doing in the classroom by sending our students out to the best Ph.D.-granting institutions across the country.”

The program is designed to encourage growth in STEM fields. However, it may be open to other fields, depending on the format of an institution’s proposal submitted to the Department of Education.

Currently, the McNair Program serves 18 higher learning institutions across Texas including University of North Texas, University of Texas at Austin and St. Edwards University.

Sonia Briseno, assistant director of the McNair Scholars Program at St. Edward’s University, said the university obtained the program in 2004. Since then, the university has served over 183 students through the program, which Briseno believes has been helpful to low-income, first generation college students.

“For many of them, they don’t know what a graduate degree means for them and what they need to do set themselves up for those opportunities,” Briseno said.

Participants who are underrepresented—according to the language of the Higher Education Act of 1965 from which the TRIO programs derive—must be low-income, first-generation college students with an emphasis on recruiting Black, Hispanic, American Indian, Alaskan Native, Native Hawaiian, Native American and Pacific Islanders.

“I am part Native Hawaiian, but I grew up in West Texas, and I never really felt connected to my roots,” said Amy Ontai, St. Edward’s McNair scholar. “I saw this as a wonderful opportunity to give back to the Native Hawaiian community, by allowing a greater representation of Native Hawaiians in doctoral degrees.”

Access to McNair funds is not limited to only those born in the U.S. The program is available to citizens, permanent residents and anyone in the U.S. for reasons that prove intent to become permanent residents.

Other criteria taken into account for the program include a review of the student’s academic background, faculty recommendations and a personal statement written by the student outlining his/her research goals.

Although the program only helps students throughout their undergraduate years, those involved in the program keep connected with the McNair faculty that helped guide them through their academic careers.

“They continue to check up on me and provide me help with applications,” said Isavannah Reyes, St. Edward’s McNair scholar. “Without their help, I am not sure I would be as motivated or prepared to apply to graduate school.”

Grants are awarded in five-year cycles with annual performance reviews. Over $40,000,000 will be allotted for the 2017 yearly budget for the McNair Program at the national level.

There are an estimated 164 institutions that will be awarded funds for the McNair program during the 2017-2018 school year, averaging an estimated $226,600 award per institution.

Depending on the size of the cohort admitted at each institution, the average award for each recipient of the McNair scholars comes out to $9,064.

U of A Designated as a Minority Serving Institution by Department of Education


FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. – The U.S. Department of Education recently designated the University of Arkansas as a Minority Serving Institution, specifically for American Indian or Alaska Native students. The designation recognizes that the U of A enrolls more than 300 American Indian and Alaska Native students, primarily members of the first group. The designation makes the U of A eligible for additional research grants and other types of federal education funding.

The specific designation was created by an executive order from President Barack Obama in late 2011, which led the U.S. Department of Education to establish the White House Initiative on American Indian and Alaska Native Education. The purpose of the initiative is to increase educational opportunities for students in both groups and to recognize and reward institutions that provide these opportunities.

“This designation by the Department of Education is a significant event for the University of Arkansas,” said Ro Di Brezzo, interim vice provost for diversity. “Achieving a diverse student body is an important priority for this campus and while there is much more to be done, this recognition is welcome. Several of our faculty and administrators have been working hard to raise the U of A’s profile among Native American students and we are grateful for their efforts.”

Schools designated as Minority Serving Institutions are also eligible to apply for and receive a variety of federal grants for research and other purposes.

“This is good news for our faculty and the various research centers at the U of A,” said Jim Rankin, vice provost for research and economic development. “This will open up opportunities that can benefit Native American students and, in fact, all students on this campus.”

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Faculty Senate pushes for admission to federal grant program – Texas State University

The Faculty Senate is creating an application to bring the McNair Program, a federal program providing funds and other resources to disadvantaged students wishing to pursue graduate studies, to the university.

The McNair Program is a discretionary, competitive grant which offers advancement through research and other scholarly opportunities geared toward earning a Ph.D.

“We’ve got a variety of academic support offerings already for students of different concentrations that are funded through this funding mechanism,” said Dr. Elizabeth Bishop, faculty senate member. “However, we don’t have the McNair (program), and the McNair is like the jewel in the crown.”

The McNair Program is part of the federal TRIO programs designed and supported by the U.S. Department of Education, and encourages the success of underrepresented individuals at post-secondary programs with the ultimate goal of earning a Ph.D.

“(The program) is about education and social transformation,” Bishop said. “It gives us a chance to prove the quality of what we’re doing in the classroom by sending our students out to the best Ph.D.-granting institutions across the country.”

The program is designed to encourage growth in STEM fields. However, it may be open to other fields, depending on the format of an institution’s proposal submitted to the Department of Education.

Currently, the McNair Program serves 18 higher learning institutions across Texas including University of North Texas, University of Texas at Austin and St. Edwards University.

Sonia Briseno, assistant director of the McNair Scholars Program at St. Edward’s University, said the university obtained the program in 2004. Since then, the university has served over 183 students through the program, which Briseno believes has been helpful to low-income, first generation college students.

“For many of them, they don’t know what a graduate degree means for them and what they need to do set themselves up for those opportunities,” Briseno said.

Participants who are underrepresented—according to the language of the Higher Education Act of 1965 from which the TRIO programs derive—must be low-income, first-generation college students with an emphasis on recruiting Black, Hispanic, American Indian, Alaskan Native, Native Hawaiian, Native American and Pacific Islanders.

“I am part Native Hawaiian, but I grew up in West Texas, and I never really felt connected to my roots,” said Amy Ontai, St. Edward’s McNair scholar. “I saw this as a wonderful opportunity to give back to the Native Hawaiian community, by allowing a greater representation of Native Hawaiians in doctoral degrees.”

Access to McNair funds is not limited to only those born in the U.S. The program is available to citizens, permanent residents and anyone in the U.S. for reasons that prove intent to become permanent residents.

Other criteria taken into account for the program include a review of the student’s academic background, faculty recommendations and a personal statement written by the student outlining his/her research goals.

Although the program only helps students throughout their undergraduate years, those involved in the program keep connected with the McNair faculty that helped guide them through their academic careers.

“They continue to check up on me and provide me help with applications,” said Isavannah Reyes, St. Edward’s McNair scholar. “Without their help, I am not sure I would be as motivated or prepared to apply to graduate school.”

Grants are awarded in five-year cycles with annual performance reviews. Over $40,000,000 will be allotted for the 2017 yearly budget for the McNair Program at the national level.

There are an estimated 164 institutions that will be awarded funds for the McNair program during the 2017-2018 school year, averaging an estimated $226,600 award per institution.

Depending on the size of the cohort admitted at each institution, the average award for each recipient of the McNair scholars comes out to $9,064.

Web extra: Lin-Manuel Miranda on the importance of federal funding …

The career of Lin-Manuel Miranda, the Pulitzer- and Tony Award-winning creator of the Broadway sensation “Hamilton,” has benefited from grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, one of the government agencies threatened with elimination by the Trump administration.

A strong proponent of federal funding for the arts, especially when it comes to kids in underserved regions of the country, Miranda spoke with Erin Moriarty and “Sunday Morning” about the importance of federal funding for the arts.
      


Erin Moriarty: Did you ever when you were growing up, honestly, ever even imagine your life like this?

Lin-Manuel Miranda: Not in a million years! Although I have to say, I think that some part of me did imagine that I wanted a life in the arts. I knew I wanted a life pursuing creative endeavors. And I know that having the gift of a public school education that had money for the arts is a big reason why those dreams were possible.

Moriarty: Why do you say that?

lin-manuel-miranda-interview-promo.jpg

The award-winning creator of “Hamilton” says government support for arts education is crucial to our children’s future.

Miranda: I was very lucky. I went to a public elementary school and high school where art and music were side-by-side with math and science. And those were the things that made me want to be good at school! (laughs) I found who I was in the theatre community in elementary school, in junior high, and in high school.

And I think it saved my life. And I think it pointed me in a direction. I think my grades were good, because I wanted to be allowed to be in the school play every year. And I think the values you learn when you’re involved in creative endeavors in school, they apply to the rest of your life.

Moriarty: But I think somebody might wonder why I’m talking about public funding of the arts to someone who is a creator of a hit Broadway show. You don’t need it.

Miranda: Well, yeah, I think you’re talking to me, because at every formative stage, I can point to public funding of the arts as making that possible.

in-the-heights-poster.jpg

Before its Tony-winning run on Broadway, Miranda’s first musical, “In the Heights,” was workshopped at the Eugene O’Neill Theater Center in Waterford, Conn., thanks in part to NEA funding.

My first job was as an intern for WNET, that’s the PBS affiliate in New York City. I organized the “Reading Rainbow” library. I worked in educational affairs. When I was 14 years old. Shuttling between there and McDonalds, being paid minimum wage on 91st and Columbus.  

My first musical was workshopped at the O’Neill Musical Theatre Center, which is partly funded by the NEA. It was the first place where I ever got any distinction, [where] I had anyone telling me, “You’re a good lyricist.”

But that’s not even the real story. The real story is the NEA funds things in all 50 states. They are the supplement when arts programs get cut. They fund reading programs between parents and young children in Kentucky. They fund, you know, educational initiatives all over the state, all over the United States. So you know, when we talk about the NEA, we’re talking about a very small amount of money that does get an enormous return on its investment in terms of what it gets out of our citizens.

Moriarty: But when a lot of people say, look, before there was public funding there were artists making art. With or without public funding, you’re going to have people who write plays, you’re going to have people who write musicals, you’re going to have people who play music.

Miranda: Yeah, that’s been true since cavemen were painting stuff on the sides of walls. We’re always going to have arts. That’s the genius of our species, isn’t it? But this is not about that. This is not about an artist getting funding for their project.

This is about funding programs that help parents read to their children. This is about funding arts and giving it a seat at the table with the rest of the other things you learn as you’re growing up. And study after study has shown that when arts are a part of your education, your overall education is richer. Test scores go up. Reading literacy goes up. Everything goes up. It does wonders. So it’s about investing in our future and in our youth. It’s not about funding art. Art will live and it’ll die. And things will succeed and things will fail. But funding our future is important.

Moriarty: But what do you say —  I don’t know if you saw that the budget director in this current administration said, “We can’t go to families of coal miners who are struggling even to have jobs and ask them to pay for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. We can’t defend that.” What do you say to that?

Miranda: I would say that public television’s a public trust. And I think it’s been used as a public trust. And I think rural communities and communities that have been underserved, poorer populations, greatly benefit from that. I reject the assumption that that’s somehow elitist.

We all grew up with Mister Rogers. We all sang, “One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten, eleven, twelve.” That’s for all of us.

Moriarty: Let’s just say that they do defund the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, they stop giving money to the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. What will happen? What is your fear?

Miranda: My fear is that arts programs and arts education programs all over the country will suffer, and our children will suffer as a result. And that’s across the board — that’s test scores, that’s our culture. You know, we’re richer when we have students engaged in these activities, when arts and music have a seat at the table. They foster activities that help us become better citizens. And I would hate to see that go away.

        
For more info: 

Message from President Salovey about federal research funding


President Peter Salovey sent the following message to the Yale community on April 21.

As scientists gather this weekend to increase awareness of the value of science in improving lives and spurring economic growth, I write to express my support for scientists and scholars working at Yale, in the United States, and around the world. I join you in affirming our collective and individual commitment to the spirit of discovery and the pursuit of knowledge.

The programs and activities targeted for deep spending cuts in 2018 — student aid, the National Institutes of Health, and the National Endowment for the Humanities, among many others — promote economic mobility, support innovation, and celebrate our common cultural heritage.

  • Deep cuts to the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Energy’s Office of Science would stifle the pace of scientific discovery at Yale and other research institutions.
  • The termination of the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities would impoverish our cultural heritage and limit the ability of scholars to share the wonder of cultural treasures with the public.
  • The elimination of Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants and cuts to the Federal Work Study Program would make higher education less affordable for low-income and first-generation college students. Yale will stand by its commitment to its undergraduates to meet their full financial need, but for many college students across the country, this aid makes all the difference. We also depend on federal funding — such as training grants — to support graduate and professional students, the future leaders in their respective fields.

Yale will continue to advocate for federal funding that advances our national and human interests. In partnership with my fellow college and university presidents, I am actively engaged in seeking federal support for Yale’s key priorities. In addition, Richard Jacob, associate vice president for federal and state relations, and his staff in the Office of Federal Relations remain committed to helping our colleagues in Washington, D.C. understand the vital importance of research and educational investments for our nation’s future.

The United States has long led the world in life-saving and life-enhancing discoveries. Advances in basic and applied research — made possible through the longstanding bipartisan support of the historic partnership between the federal government and American research universities — have powered our nation’s economy and improved millions of lives. Locally in New Haven, the effect is apparent in the 60 companies created around Yale inventions over the past 20 years. Federal funding for the arts and humanities has helped make all our lives more meaningful. The rewards for our country and our humanity have been extraordinary.

Today, I invite members of the Yale community to join me in affirming the continued importance of research and scholarship. Only through learning and discovery — light and truth — can we face our challenges with confidence and, as stated in the university’s mission, “improve the world today and for future generations.”

The 62 agencies and programs Trump wants to eliminate

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President Trump’s proposed budget will slash funding for a number of popular federal programs and agencies.
USA TODAY

Corrections clarifications: A previous version of this story referred incorrectly to a Fish and Wildlife Service program proposed for elimination in President Trump’s budget submission. The Department of the Interior says it is the National Wildlife Refuge fund, a $13.2 million revenue-sharing arrangement with local governments.

WASHINGTON — President Trump’s proposed budget takes a cleaver to domestic programs, with many agencies taking percentage spending cuts in the double digits.

But for dozens of smaller agencies and programs, the cut is 100%.

Community development block grants. The Weatherization Assistance Program. The Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program. The National Endowment for the Arts. The Corporation for Public Broadcasting. All would be axed if Congress adopts Trump’s budget.

Also proposed for elimination are lesser-known bureaucracies like the McGovern-Dole International Food for Education Program, the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program and the Inter-American Foundation.

Many of those programs have constituencies in states and cities across the country — and their champions in Congress. “The president’s beholden to nobody but the people who elected him, and yes, I understand that every lawmaker over there has pet projects,” said Trump budget director Mick Mulvaney. “That’s the nature of the beast.”

More coverage:

Trump’s first budget uses dramatic cuts to fund military buildup

62 agencies and programs Trump wants to eliminate

On immigration, Trump’s budget calls for far more than a wall

Trump proposes to hike TSA fee on airline tickets

Trump’s NASA budget preserves Mars mission, cuts Earth science, asteroid trip, education

He said not every program would disappear overnight. The Corporation for Public Broadcasting, which now receives $485 million a year, might still get some federal funding in 2018, for example. “It might take a while to unwind that relationship. It’s just the nature of contracts,” Mulvaney said.

Trump’s budget says hundreds of programs and agencies would be eliminated — with more than 50 in the Environmental Protection Agency. But his first budget proposal identified 62 specifically. The list:


Department of Agriculture

Water and Wastewater loan and grant program ($498 million): “Rural communities can be served by private sector financing or other federal investments in rural water infrastructure, such as the Environmental Protection Agency’s State Revolving Funds,” the budget says.

McGovern-Dole International Food for Education program ($202 million): Trump’s budget says the program — a sort of Third World school lunch project — “lacks evidence that it is being effectively implemented to reduce food insecurity.”


Department of Commerce

Economic Development Administration ($221 million): Obama’s 2017 budget touted the agency as ” the only federal government agency with a mission and programs focused exclusively on economic development.” The Trump budget says it has “limited measurable impacts and duplicates other federal programs.”

Minority Business Development Agency ($32 million): The White House says this minority business incubator program is “duplicative” of other programs in the Small Business Administration.


Department of Education 

Supporting Effective Instruction State Grants program ($2.4 billion): The White House says the program is “poorly targeted and spread thinly across thousands of districts with scant evidence of impact.”

21st Century Community Learning Centers program ($1.2 billion): The formula grants to states support before- and after-school and summer programs. “The programs lacks strong evidence of meeting its objectives, such as improving student achievement,” the budget says.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant program ($732 million): This financial aid program, known as SEOG, help give up to $4,000 a year to college students based on financial need. The Trump administration says it’s a “less well-targeted” program than Pell Grants.

Striving Readers Comprehensive Literacy Program ($190 million): The grants are targeted toward students with disabilities or limited English proficiency.

Teacher Quality Partnership ($43 million): A teacher training and recruitment grant program.

Impact Aid Support Payments for Federal Property ($67 million): Obama also proposed the elimination of this program, which reimburses schools for lost tax revenue from tax-exempt federal properties in their districts.

International Education programs ($7 million): This line item funds a variety of exchange programs, migrant schools and special education services abroad.


Department of Energy

Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy ($382 million): This alternative energy research program was established by Congress in 2007 with the goal of funding projects that the private sector would not.

Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program: This loan fund finances projects that combat global warming.

Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Program: Helps finance fuel-efficient vehicle research. “The private sector is better positioned to finance disruptive energy research and development and to commercialize innovative technologies,” the White House says.

Weatherization Assistance Program ($121 million): The program helps homeowners make their homes more energy efficient with grants of up to $6,500.

State Energy Program ($28.2 million): Gives grants to states to help them work on energy efficiency and anti-climate change programs.


Department of Health and Human Services

Health professions and nursing training programs ($403 million): Trump’s budget says these programs “lack evidence that they significantly improve the nation’s health workforce.” Instead, Trump wants to provide scholarships and student loans in in exchange for service in areas with a nursing shortage.

Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program ($3.4 billion): LIHEAP helps the elderly and low-income people pay their heating and power bills.

Community Services Block Grants ($715 million): CSBG is an anti-poverty grant program that the White House says duplicates emergency food assistance and employment programs.


Department of Housing and Urban Development

Community Development Block Grant program ($3 billion): CDBG has been a bread-and-butter funding source for local communities for 42 years, totaling more than $150 billion in grants over its history. “The program is not well-targeted to the poorest populations and has not demonstrated results,” Trump’s budget says.

Section 4 Capacity Building for Community Development and Affordable Housing program ($35 million): The affordable housing program supports organizations like the Local Initiatives Support Corp., which the White House says should be privately funded.


Department of the Interior

Abandoned Mine Land grants ($160 million): The Trump administration wants to eliminate a discretionary grant program that it says overlaps with a $2.7 billion permanent fund.

National Heritage Areas ($20 million): These are state-and-federal partnerships to preserve natural, historic, scenic, and cultural resources.

National Wildlife Refuge fund ($13.2 million): This is a revenue-sharing fund that makes payments to counties where wildlife refuges are located from fees the Fish and Wildlife Service receives.


Department of Justice

State Criminal Alien Assistance Program ($210 million): Four states receive the bulk of the funding from this program, which reimburses states for the cost of incarcerating criminal immigrants.


Department of Labor

Senior Community Service Employment Program ($434 million): SCSEP is a job training program for low-income people 55 and older that the White House says is “ineffective.”

Occupational Safety and Health Administration training grants ($11 million)


Department of State and U.S. Agency for International Development

The Global Climate Change Initiative ($1.3 billion) was an Obama administration proposal to support the Paris climate agreement. It includes the Green Climate Fund ($250 million), the Strategic Climate Fund ($60 million) and the Clean Technology Fund ($171 million).

Emergency Refugee and Migration Assistance Fund ($70 million): The account allows the president to “provide humanitarian assistance for unexpected and urgent refugee and migration needs worldwide,” but Trump said the mission is best left to international and non-governmental relief organizations

The East-West Center ($16 million): Chartered by Congress as the Center for Cultural and Technical Interchange Between East and West, the Honolulu-based nonprofit has a mission of strengthening relations among Pacific Rim countries.


Department of Transportation

The Essential Air Service program ($175 million) provides federal subsidies for commercial air service at rural airports. EAS flights are not full and have high subsidy costs per passenger. Trump’s budget says several of those airports are close to major airports, and that rural communities could be served by other modes of transportation.

Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery grants ($499 million): The Obama-era TIGER program funded multi-modal and multi-jurisdictional projects, but the White House wants to cut existing infrastructure spending in favor of his own $1 trillion infrastructure proposal.


Department of the Treasury

Community Development Financial Institutions grants ($210 million): Trump’s budget says the 23-year-old program to support community banks and credit unions is obsolete.


U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Geographic watershed programs ($427 million) like the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative ($40 million) and the Chesapeake Bay Restoration Initiative ($14 million): The Trump budget would turn over responsibility for those efforts to state and regional governments.

Fifty other EPA programs ($347 million) including Energy Star, Targeted Airshed Grants, the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program, and infrastructure assistance to Alaska Native Villages and the Mexico border.


National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Office of Education ($115 million), which the Trump budget says duplicates efforts by the agency’s Science Mission Directorate.


Independent agencies and commissions

African Development Foundation ($26 million): An independent foreign aid agency focusing on economic development in Africa.

Appalachian Regional Commission ($119 million): A 52-year-old agency focused on economic growth in 420 counties.

Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board ($11 million): The agency was created by the Clean Air Act of 1990 and investigates chemical accidents.

Corporation for National and Community Service ($771 million): The agency is best known for its Americorps community service program.

Corporation for Public Broadcasting ($485 million): Supports public television and radio stations, including the PBS television network and, indirectly, National Public Radio.

Delta Regional Authority ($45 million): An economic development agency for the eight-state Mississippi Delta region.

Denali Commission ($14 million): A state and federal economic development agency for Alaska.

Institute of Museum and Library Services ($231 million): Provides money to the nation’s 123,000 libraries and 35,000 museums.

Inter-American Foundation ($23 million): Promotes “citizen-led grassroots development” in Latin America and the Caribbean.

U.S. Trade and Development Agency ($66 million): Promotes U.S. exports in energy, transportation, and telecommunications.

Legal Services Corp. ($366 million): A 43-year-old congressionally chartered organization that helps provide free civil legal advice to poor people.

National Endowment for the Arts ($152 million): Encourages participation in the arts.

National Endowment for the Humanities ($155 million): Supports scholarship into literature and culture.

Neighborhood Reinvestment Corp. ($175 million): Better known as Neighborworks America, the organization supports local affordable housing programs.

Northern Border Regional Commission ($7 million): A regional economic development agency serving parts of Maine, New Hampshire, New York and Vermont.

Overseas Private Investment Corp.($63 million): Encourages U.S. private investment in the developing world.

U.S. Institute of Peace ($40 million): Government-run think tank focusing on conflict prevention.

U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness ($4 million): An independent agency coordinating the federal government’s efforts to reduce homelessness.

Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars ($11 million): A program to provide scholarships and fellowships in social sciences and humanities.


U.S. Sen. Jerry Moran addresses Kansas State Board of Education

The proposed 2018 federal budget from President Donald Trump’s administration that slashes $54 billion in discretionary spending — including a $9.2 billion cut to federal education spending but $1.4 billion more for school choice — largely doesn’t have support from Capitol Hill.

That was the message U.S. Sen. Jerry Moran, R-Kansas, delivered to members of the Kansas State Board of Education during a special meeting Saturday in Topeka.

“I think the dramatic reductions in spending would not be supported by enough senators to pass,” he said. “I want to make sure the process we’ve been through as an appropriations committee is what the end result is.”

“President Obama’s budget, I don’t know if it ever received a single vote for the eight years he was president,” Moran continued. “This president’s budget will receive little support as well.”

Vouchers and charter schools, which Trump and U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos are championing but which are a major concern for the public education community, can’t become a reality without congressional approval, Moran said.

“You can’t take money and put it into vouchers without Congress allowing that,” Moran said, adding that there haven’t been conversations among other lawmakers about pushing legislation forward to create vouchers. He said DeVos told him that there will be no federally mandated school vouchers for Kansas, and he said he will hold her to that promise.

“Her committment to me was that there would be no federally required vouchers,” he said. “We would be an active opponent to any kind of increase in the federal government telling us how to run our schools here in Kansas.”

Kansas Education Commissioner Randy Watson said that if Trump’s proposal to cut Title II funding for teacher quality initiatives and more money is put into charter schools and vouchers, Kansas will be “disproportionally hurt.”

“We don’t get a lot of that money anyway,” he said. “Charters and vouchers have a difficult time in our Kansas Constitution and rural state,” he said. “We’re not asking for more (money) but we can protect what we have. We’re asking for what is supposed to be coming to Kansas.”

When it comes to money for education in general, Moran said, the Senate Appropriations Committee has passed an FY17 funding bill that keeps education funding relatively flat.

“Education would receive the funding that it’s expecting and it will be consistent with what it has received in the past if we’re successful in getting out of the continuing resolution and getting these bills passed,” he said.

Moran said the labor, health and education spending bill for fiscal year 2017 is one of the largest outside of defense spending. He told state board members that “Labor H” is one of 12 spending bills that will be passed and the congressional continuing resolution will “go away” on or about April 28.

“We are headed in the direction I think you like,” Moran told board members. However, funding increases proposed by the Senate Appropriations subcommittee for Title I and II and Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, or IDEA, are “very modest,” he conceded.

Funding for preschool and afterschool programs “has diminished just a little bit,” and career and technical education is going to stay at level funding, Moran said.

More money needs to flow from the federal level to the states to educate special education students under the IDEA, Moran said. He said that while Congress has never fully met its obligation to fund 40 percent of the total amount of money needed to educate children with disabilities, he will “continue that effort” for federal funding of the IDEA so state money for general education doesn’t have to be used to meet federal requirements to educate students with disabilities.

Board member Jim McNiece told Moran that he and his fellow board members want to make sure the Every Student Succeeds Act, or ESSA, is predictable so that the board’s “Kansans Can” vision “to lead the world in the success of every student” can move forward.

“We have a very challenging plan. It’s a moonshot, as we say, to do this,” he said. “It’s our unique plan. It’s not Florida’s or Washington’s or Maine’s. It’s Kansas. In that plan are some things we would like to continue to be funded.”

The ESSA, signed into law by President Obama in 2015, reauthorized the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. The ESSA allows states to have flexibility in determining accountability standards for student success.

McNiece said he would like to see how the state’s ESSA plans, which Kansas will submit to the U.S. Department of Education in October, play out. He said he is concerned, however, that the Trump administration hasn’t named an assistant secretary for elementary and secondary education who will approve ESSA plans.

“There needs to be an apparatus to have these plans approved,” McNiece said, adding that the concern is felt by elected and professional education officials nationwide. “There’s no review process. There’s nobody at home to do it. They’re not saving any money and they’re not helping us in this regard.”

Jim Porter, chairman of the board, told Moran one of his chief concerns is that Kansas is having a hard time attracting and retaining quality teachers.

“In some places, it is a crisis,” he said, adding that mentoring and professional development programs need to be funded. “If we don’t have teachers in our classrooms that are prepared to meet the needs of today’s students, we very well are not doing the best for them.”

Porter said even though the federal government provides just 10 percent of the state’s total education funding, what money Kansas gets from Washington, D.C., is important, particularly for remedial programs and increasing teacher quality.

“We couldn’t do without that,” he said, “especially in this era of state budget cuts. It would have a huge impact if we didn’t have it.”

Contact reporter Angela Deines at (785) 295-1143 or @AngelaDeines on Twitter.

Early childhood education in Delaware receives boost from second federal grant

Head-start programs in Delaware were named the beneficiaries of another generous handout on Thursday.

An announcement made by Governor John Carney, at Wilmington’s Latin American Community Center on April 20, 2017, revealed the new federal grant, the Early Head Start-Child Care Partnership. Following a similar grant, awarding $ 7.25 million to the state in January 2015, the funds shall support the expansion of high quality early childhood education to more of the state’s youngest learners.

“A high quality early learning experience is important for all children, and research shows this is especially true for our children from low-income families. High quality early learning yields substantial benefits for these children,” said Governor Carney, noting a 39 percent reduction in special education placements, 30 percent increase in high school graduation, 50 percent increase in college attendance, and 20 percent reduction in the likelihood of serving time in jail. “Thanks to this grant, all children in these centers’ classrooms will benefit from teachers with higher education and classrooms with higher quality materials and structural supports.”

Joined by his Secretary of Education Susan Bunting, Governor Carney then toured LACC’s early childhood center, one of the 203 statewide Delaware Stars’ 5-star programs, which had received money through the earlier appropriation.

According to Governor Carney’s administration, Delaware had already seen a sharp increase in enrollment numbers of low-income children in highly-rated Delaware Stars programs, up 78 percent, between 2011 and 2016. That improvement was attributed to significant investments for strengthening the quality of early learning through advanced training for early childhood educators, expansion of classroom materials and onsite support, and the implementation of systems to detect and address physical and mental health issues.

With continued commitment from the new administration, the expectation is that the additional $7.65 million grant—benefitting children from birth to age 3 years, and their families, being served in highly-rated Delaware Stars programs—will continue the expansion of early learning opportunities for children from low-income families, with a focus on high quality care options in Kent and Sussex counties.