Trump’s budget by the numbers: What gets cut and why – CNN.com

Updated 3:58 PM ET, Tue May 23, 2017

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(CNN)President Donald Trump’s team released its first full budget proposal on Tuesday, and while lawmakers are likely to dismiss most of it — as they traditionally do with most White House wishlists — the document provides fresh insight into the administration’s priorities.

MVCC awarded $257500 per year in federal grant

Mohawk Valley Community College is one of 26 schools across the state to share in more than in $9 million federal education grants, U.S. Sens. Charles E. Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand announced Thursday.

The money is for the college-readiness Upward Bound program, a federally-funded educational opportunity outreach program that promotes and supports students from low-income families. Upward Bound works with Proctor High School students in Utica through a campus-based program that provides tutoring and instruction in literature, composition, mathematics, science and foreign language during the academic year and summer months. 

This grant will serve 60 Proctor students in grades 9 to 12. MVCC receives $257,500 a year. The award is for five years, according to Alen Smajic, MVCC spokesman.

Trump’s budget slashes education but cites one CT program as a …

CtMirror.org

A sign for a school-choice fair outside a school in Hartford

President Donald Trump unveiled a budget Tuesday that slashes federal funding for education by 13.5 percent – cuts that probably would handicap or kill several programs that thousands of Connecticut children participate in each year.

He also is proposing a massive increase for school choice, citing Connecticut’s “Open Choice” program, which provides funding for Hartford residents to attend suburban schools, as a national model.

The Republican president also proposes level funding for the two major education grants that the state and Connecticut districts receive from the federal government.

Here are four things to know about what the Trump budget could mean to you:

School choice may increase

Students in Connecticut have lots of choices for which school to attend. One in eight students this school year attend a magnet, charter, vocational or other school of choice.

But thousands of students remain in struggling, low-performing schools.

The availability of school choice options can largely be attributed to the state’s Supreme Court, which ordered the legislature in 1996 to eliminate the inequalities created by segregation of Hartford’s black and Hispanic students.

The order spurred creation of a large number of new magnet schools as the state’s chief strategy to get suburban, white students to attend school with city students.

But recently the legislature and Gov. Dannel P. Malloy have balked at opening additional regional themed magnet schools. Instead, they say, the state should focus its time and funding on the troubled schools students already attend.

The state also has offered suburban districts – many of which have rapidly declining school-aged populations – financial incentives to offer more seats to city students through the “Open Choice” program that Trump cites as one of three models in his budget. But most suburban communities have not done so, saying the state wasn’t offering enough funding.

Trump hopes a new $1 billion competitive grant called FOCUS – Furthering Options for Children to Unlock Success – will spur a drastic expansion of school choice options across the U.S.

So would a large federal grant be enough to lure Connecticut’s districts or the state to step up?

Robert Rader, the executive director of the Connecticut Assocation of Boards of Education, doesn’t think so.

“I have seen and heard no desire for more school choice from our members at this point. They are struggling just to keep what they have in their schools,” he said during an interview, pointing out several federal unfunded mandates that already exist. “They should stop trying to make promises before they fund the ones they have already made.”

And state residents should not count on the administration of the Democratic governor to embrace Trump’s approach to funding expansion of school choice.

“We do have concerns about the potential diversion of funds that pay for the educational needs of students living in poverty going instead to fund new school choice programming,” said Abbe Smith, a spokesman for the State Department of Education.

“Connecticut has maintained a commitment to providing students and families with a diverse public school choice landscape that includes traditional public schools, magnets, and charters. We continue to review the president’s budget proposal, but are greatly concerned by deep cuts to education programs,” said Meg Green, a spokesman for the governor.

Cuts aplenty elsewhere

Trump’s budget proposal leaves untouched the second-largest source of federal education money for Connecticut’s schools, the so-called Title I grant, which provides schools in the state with about $120 million annually. However, the proposal would eliminate or drastically cut funding for several other programs geared toward improving educational outcomes for students from low-income families.

Trump proposes eliminating the $9 million the state receives each year for before- and after-school programs and summer programs through the 21st Century Community Learning Centers grant. These grants, which run between $25,000 and $200,000 a year, help pay for programs in Bridgeport, Hartford, Waterbury and numerous other communities. (See here for which communities.)

CtMirror.org file photo

A high school in Bridgeport (CT Mirror file photo)

The $2.1 billion in federal funding that currently goes to class-size reduction and teacher development efforts would be eliminated, making it the largest cut in the budget proposal for primary and secondary schools. Connecticut and its local districts receive about $25 million each year through these grants. Bridgeport, one of the state’s lowest-performing districts, has received $2 million so far this fiscal year from this grant. Hartford has received $2.9 million. (See town-by-town grants here.)

A $50 million school safety grant created in the wake of the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown would be scaled back to $18 million. That grant goes to help states and experts research approaches to reducing violence in schools and referrals to juvenile courts. Researchers at the University of Connecticut for the last several years have used this grant to look at the role of school-based police.

During a conference call with reporters, federal education officials said it would be up to state or local governments whether to make up for the cuts to various programs.

Funding for Head Start, which provides early child care and education for thousands of low-income children in Connecticut, would increase nationwide by about $80 million next year.

Federal aid for school lunches would increase from $12.3 billion to $13 billion, and funding for school breakfast would increase from $4.5 billion to $4.8 billion.

Special education funding static

Federal funding would remain essentially the same for special education, the largest federal funding resource for Connecticut’s schools. Connecticut and local districts received just under $130 million in funding for special education last fiscal year.

Given that special education costs are the fastest-growing expense in Connecticut school districts, flat federal funding probably would result in general education cuts in many districts because federal law forbids cutting spending on programs for physically and intellectually disabled students. Just under 10 percent of spending on special education currently comes from federal funding.

Funding for higher education slashed

The president’s budget would eliminate subsidized Stafford student loans. The federal government has paid the interest on these loans while students are in school. Last fiscal year students attending college in Connecticut received $203 million in subsidized loans.

Jacqueline Rabe Thomas / CtMirror.org

University of Connecticut graduates

The budget also would eliminate the student loan forgiveness program, which was designed to clear student debt for those who work for 10 years in teaching or other professions deemed to be in the public interest. The program was created in 2007, and nationwide more than 500,000 people are on track to have their loans forgiven, starting in October.

Federal education officials said only those who take out loans after July 1, 2018, would be affected by elimination of the loan-forgiveness program and subsidized federal loans.

Trump proposes making huge cuts in funding for federal research, which many of the state’s public and private college rely on. Most notably, he proposes a 20 percent reduction to the National Institutes of Health “to improve efficiencies in the research enterprise” by reducing the burden of regulation on recipients. Funding for research awards through the National Science Foundation would be cut by 11 percent.

Trump K-12 Priorities on Full Display in 2018 Budget Pitch

Big boost sought for school choice amid deep cuts to other programs

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President Donald Trump’s budget proposal for the U.S. Department of Education made plenty of waves for its emphasis on school choice and its cuts to long-standing programs—but Congress has no obligation to go along with the plan, and there hasn’t been a show of overwhelming support for either idea on Capitol Hill just yet.

The fiscal 2018 proposal from the Trump administration emphasizes the commitment to choice and austerity, despite the political sensitivities involved.

It would cut $9.2 billion, or 13.5 percent, from the Education Department’s budget, bringing it down to $59 billion. It would launch a new $1 billion grant program for public school choice under Title I; increase charter school funding by about 50 percent, to $500 million; and create a $250 million grant program in the Education Innovation and Research program to fund private school vouchers and research their effects.

The $250 million grant program would be enough to provide 17,500 to 26,000 vouchers to private schools, including religious ones, in the range of $8,000 to $12,000 per student. However, a spokeswoman for the department denied that the new $250 million program would constitute a federal voucher program, arguing instead that the department would be supporting states that applied for the grants to expand school choice.

Meanwhile, $2 billion in grants for teacher development and class-size reduction under Title II would be eliminated in Trump’s budget, along with $1.2 billion in after-school and summer programs, and $400 million for a new block grant under Title IV of the federal education law for programs for student health, education technology, and other issues. Title I and special education funding would also get cut by roughly 4 and 1 percent, respectively, from fiscal 2017 levels.

Divergent Views

Lawmakers in charge of the department’s budget shared divergent views about the Trump spending proposals during a House hearing last week, where U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos defended the budget. It was her first public appearance on Capitol Hill since her contentious confirmation hearing.

Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla., the chairman of the House Appropriations subcommittee that funds the department, praised the blueprint for promoting educational opportunities in general. But he didn’t discuss the Title I choice fund or the voucher proposal, and after the hearing stressed he wasn’t ready to pick “winners and losers” in the education budget yet.

“I’m a big fan of charter schools,” Cole said, when asked about distinctions he was making between charters and vouchers in the budget. And he questioned the proposal’s cuts to GEAR UP and TRIO, two programs that help disadvantaged students reach postsecondary education.

Meanwhile, Democrats hammered DeVos over the various cuts, and also sparred with the secretary about whether she would allow a federal voucher program to fund private schools that discriminate against students, including LGBT children and African-American students. DeVos emphasized state prerogatives and parent choice in her answers, but in a later statement also emphasized that schools participating in the new $250 million voucher research program would have to follow federal law.

“I’m shocked that you cannot come up with one example of discrimination [where] you would stand up for students,” Rep. Katherine Clark, D-Mass., told DeVos during the discussion of vouchers.

Despite the administration’s proposed cuts to several programs, it’s likely that Title I, Title II, and the Title IV block grant will be funded at roughly the same levels they are now, said David DeSchryver, the senior vice president at Whiteboard Advisors, a research and advocacy firm. The Title I choice program would require a politically difficult change in federal law, he noted. And the $250 million voucher research program might be too small to justify politically, DeSchryver added.

“This puts a lot on the congressional plate, and I don’t think they’re ready to navigate yet how all this will work,” DeSchryver said.

Trump’s budget plan represents the biggest single-year overall proposed cut to the department since President Ronald Reagan’s budget pitch for fiscal 1983. Congress ultimately increased the department’s budget for that year.

In her testimony to House lawmakers, DeVos repeatedly stressed that the budget makes tough choices and puts what she called appropriate new limits on the federal government’s involvement in education. And she said that giving more power to parents and students, along with states and local communities, is long overdue.

“Instead, we spend a lot of time talking about schools and systems,” DeVos said.

She also said that despite the cuts, the Every Student Succeeds Act (the federal education law that kicks in for the 2017-18 school year) and other changes in the budget proposal would allow schools to be more flexible and to better serve students. But Democrats countered that any such flexibility was dwarfed by the range of proposed cuts.

On the Chopping Block

The budget would phase out or eliminate a total of 22 programs.

DeSchryver said Comprehensive Literacy Development Grants, which currently get $190 million but would be eliminated in Trump’s budget, are in serious jeopardy.

Outside of the Education Department, the budget plan proposes an $85 million cut to Head Start, which is administered by the Department of Health and Human Services. There would also be cuts to the National Center for Child Health and Human Development of $1 billion, as well as a reduction for the Children’s Health Insurance Program of $5.8 billion over 10 years.

Related Blog

Several school advocacy groups swiftly condemned the budget proposal. The Council of Chief State School Officers said the “cuts to key federal education programs” were “unacceptable.” And the National School Boards Association called the proposed cuts a “devastating blow” that would be compounded by the budget’s attempt to create “a second system of taxpayer-funded education” outside of traditional public schools.

A few school choice advocates were also wary of the choice proposals in the budget. For example, Lindsey Burke, the director of the Center for Education Policy at the Heritage Foundation, which favors limited government, said that the federal government should not be involved in running school choice, even as she praised the overall reduction in the Education Department’s budget.

“The Trump administration has outlined a budget that rightly downsizes spending and program count at the Department of Education—a long overdue step that can pave the way for a restoration of state and local control of education,” Burke said.

Vol. 36, Issue 33, Pages 1, 19

Published in Print: May 31, 2017, as Trump Priorities On Full Display In K-12 Budget

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What Trump’s education budget proposal means for students and …

President Donald Trump’s education budget could chop $9.2 billion from programs that promote early learning, arts education, college work-study, and access to federal education grants and loans, pending congressional approval.

The proposed legislation aims to increase school choice by expanding charter school and voucher funding by $400 million and pours $1 billion into an incentive grant program for school districts that allow school choice – a priority investment in a plan championed by President Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. The budget proposal, which was released May 23 and would result in a 13.5% decrease in Department of Education funding, was first reported by The Washington Post.

But with cuts to federal financial aid programs like the Perkins loans and Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG), federal work-study, and after-school care, many feel as if the new budget is anything but an investment in the future.

“This budget is grossly out of step with the needs of young people and the priorities of most members of Congress,” says Reid Setzer, director of government affairs for the nationwide young adult education and advocacy group, Young Invincibles. “It fails to invest in young people and the future of our country by slashing opportunities for young adults to gain skills through education, sustain themselves and their families, and contribute to our workforce.”

The end of Public Service Loan Forgiveness?

While the budget is expected to be revised as it moves through Congress, the suggested cuts and restructured student loan repayment plans are frightening to low-income families and students who have planned their economic and educational futures on government assistance.

Take the Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) program, for example: After 10 years of monthly payments while working in public service or for a nonprofit, remaining student debt will disappear. The proposed budget would end the program, cutting $859 million.

Fortunately, borrowers who are already enrolled in PSLF will be grandfathered in, meaning they will still be eligible for loan forgiveness even after the program ends. The changes would apply to loans that originated after July 1, 2018.

Amanda Aubrey, a staff attorney at Legal Action of Wisconsin, is relying on the government-promised freedom from thousands of dollars of debt. Aubrey, 38, says she planned her career around eligibility and calls the sudden uncertainty of that relief the “bait-and-switch of a lifetime.” She graduated from the University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law in 2013.

“Without it, it’s unlikely I will ever be able to own my own home, or even discharge more than half the debt on my own,” says Aubrey. “My retirement will likely get pushed back until I’m 75, because the money I might otherwise have saved would have been required for loan repayment.”

While he recognizes that the Trump administration has suggested a system of grandfathering for current PSLF enrollees, Setzer says it’s not guaranteed, and even if it was, the incentive for individuals seeking public servant jobs could vanish with the dismantling of the program.

Aubrey says the potential diminishing number of public servants also could mean an alarming lack of services for those who need them most.

“Having the PSLF as an option made it possible to follow the path I wanted to follow, rather than having to pursue a path that would make enough money to pay back the loans,” Aubrey says. “Low-income clients desperately need legal representation, and low-paying jobs for attorneys are usually the only prayer such clients have at getting the help they need. Eliminating the PSLF takes away that possibility, for legal, medical, and many other professionals.”

What it means for families

The budget’s impacts could be felt far earlier than college and professional careers. Government-funded after-school care is in jeopardy in the proposed budget.

The plan proposes cutting $1.2 billion from government-funded after-school and summer programs.

“(Lack of after-school care) would put a strain on the family, as far as the wife and myself having to rush home to make sure the kids are taken care of,” says Robert Chatmon, a father of three in Athens, Ga. “If they’re at after-school, you have trained people who are there that are willing to look after them, take care of them – give them that extra support that they need.”

The fear of losing funding for after-school care looms large, as the budget’s targeted programs primarily assist poor families.

“You end up hurting people who depend on the very program you’re cutting,” Chatmon says.

What programs are being cut

Here are some key suggested cuts in the proposed education budget:

●     $2.3 billion from programs that provide teacher training and class-size reduction

●     $1.2 billion from government-funded after-school and summer programs

●     $1 billion from federal loans for disadvantaged students, including Perkins loans

●     $490 million – 50% – from federal work-study programs

In addition, no money would be allocated for certain grants that help to fund mental health services, anti-bullying campaigns, advanced placement, and physical education courses.

What’s next

The president’s May 23 budget proposal is one step of five in signing the budget for the next fiscal year – beginning Oct. 1 – into law.

The next step – congressional review and resolution – requires the House and Senate budget committees to decide and vote on spending limits for the overall budget.

Then the appropriations committees in the House and Senate will allocate exact funding for all discretionary programs.

The House and Senate will then debate and vote on the changes made to funding requests for each of the appropriations committees.

The president must then sign into law each of the 12 appropriation bills in the 2018 budget as they are approved by Congress.

While the Trump administration has requested large and far-reaching cuts to federal education spending, the specific dollar amounts are likely to change, and it is possible that some of the proposed reductions and expansions will not pass through Congress by the October deadline. 

MagnifyMoney is a price comparison and financial education website, founded by former bankers who use their knowledge of how the system works to help you save money.

MagnifyMoney

What Trump’s education budget proposal means for students and their families

President Donald Trump’s education budget could chop $9.2 billion from programs that promote early learning, arts education, college work-study, and access to federal education grants and loans, pending congressional approval.

The proposed legislation aims to increase school choice by expanding charter school and voucher funding by $400 million and pours $1 billion into an incentive grant program for school districts that allow school choice – a priority investment in a plan championed by President Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. The budget proposal, which was released May 23 and would result in a 13.5% decrease in Department of Education funding, was first reported by The Washington Post.

But with cuts to federal financial aid programs like the Perkins loans and Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG), federal work-study, and after-school care, many feel as if the new budget is anything but an investment in the future.

“This budget is grossly out of step with the needs of young people and the priorities of most members of Congress,” says Reid Setzer, director of government affairs for the nationwide young adult education and advocacy group, Young Invincibles. “It fails to invest in young people and the future of our country by slashing opportunities for young adults to gain skills through education, sustain themselves and their families, and contribute to our workforce.”

The end of Public Service Loan Forgiveness?

While the budget is expected to be revised as it moves through Congress, the suggested cuts and restructured student loan repayment plans are frightening to low-income families and students who have planned their economic and educational futures on government assistance.

Take the Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) program, for example: After 10 years of monthly payments while working in public service or for a nonprofit, remaining student debt will disappear. The proposed budget would end the program, cutting $859 million.

Fortunately, borrowers who are already enrolled in PSLF will be grandfathered in, meaning they will still be eligible for loan forgiveness even after the program ends. The changes would apply to loans that originated after July 1, 2018.

Amanda Aubrey, a staff attorney at Legal Action of Wisconsin, is relying on the government-promised freedom from thousands of dollars of debt. Aubrey, 38, says she planned her career around eligibility and calls the sudden uncertainty of that relief the “bait-and-switch of a lifetime.” She graduated from the University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law in 2013.

“Without it, it’s unlikely I will ever be able to own my own home, or even discharge more than half the debt on my own,” says Aubrey. “My retirement will likely get pushed back until I’m 75, because the money I might otherwise have saved would have been required for loan repayment.”

While he recognizes that the Trump administration has suggested a system of grandfathering for current PSLF enrollees, Setzer says it’s not guaranteed, and even if it was, the incentive for individuals seeking public servant jobs could vanish with the dismantling of the program.

Aubrey says the potential diminishing number of public servants also could mean an alarming lack of services for those who need them most.

“Having the PSLF as an option made it possible to follow the path I wanted to follow, rather than having to pursue a path that would make enough money to pay back the loans,” Aubrey says. “Low-income clients desperately need legal representation, and low-paying jobs for attorneys are usually the only prayer such clients have at getting the help they need. Eliminating the PSLF takes away that possibility, for legal, medical, and many other professionals.”

What it means for families

The budget’s impacts could be felt far earlier than college and professional careers. Government-funded after-school care is in jeopardy in the proposed budget.

The plan proposes cutting $1.2 billion from government-funded after-school and summer programs.

“(Lack of after-school care) would put a strain on the family, as far as the wife and myself having to rush home to make sure the kids are taken care of,” says Robert Chatmon, a father of three in Athens, Ga. “If they’re at after-school, you have trained people who are there that are willing to look after them, take care of them – give them that extra support that they need.”

The fear of losing funding for after-school care looms large, as the budget’s targeted programs primarily assist poor families.

“You end up hurting people who depend on the very program you’re cutting,” Chatmon says.

What programs are being cut

Here are some key suggested cuts in the proposed education budget:

●     $2.3 billion from programs that provide teacher training and class-size reduction

●     $1.2 billion from government-funded after-school and summer programs

●     $1 billion from federal loans for disadvantaged students, including Perkins loans

●     $490 million – 50% – from federal work-study programs

In addition, no money would be allocated for certain grants that help to fund mental health services, anti-bullying campaigns, advanced placement, and physical education courses.

What’s next

The president’s May 23 budget proposal is one step of five in signing the budget for the next fiscal year – beginning Oct. 1 – into law.

The next step – congressional review and resolution – requires the House and Senate budget committees to decide and vote on spending limits for the overall budget.

Then the appropriations committees in the House and Senate will allocate exact funding for all discretionary programs.

The House and Senate will then debate and vote on the changes made to funding requests for each of the appropriations committees.

The president must then sign into law each of the 12 appropriation bills in the 2018 budget as they are approved by Congress.

While the Trump administration has requested large and far-reaching cuts to federal education spending, the specific dollar amounts are likely to change, and it is possible that some of the proposed reductions and expansions will not pass through Congress by the October deadline. 

MagnifyMoney is a price comparison and financial education website, founded by former bankers who use their knowledge of how the system works to help you save money.

MagnifyMoney

Keene State finally receives money for Upward Bound | Local News …

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Education Budget Prioritizes Students, Empowers Parents, Saves Taxpayer Dollars

Today, the Trump Administration released the Fiscal Year 2018 budget, which lays out a series of proposals and priorities designed to ensure every student has an equal opportunity to receive a high quality education. Through this budget, the President has reaffirmed his commitment to returning decision-making power over education back where it belongs—in the hands of parents, educators and State leaders.

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos issued the following statement:

“This budget makes a historic investment in America’s students. President Trump is committed to ensuring the Department focuses on returning decision-making power back to the States, where it belongs, and on giving parents more control over their child’s education. It also ensures stable funding for critical programs, including Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).

“The budget also reflects a series of tough choices we have had to make when assessing the best use of taxpayer money. It ensures funding for programs with proven results for students while taking a hard look at programs that sound nice but simply haven’t yielded the desired outcomes.

“By refocusing the Department’s funding priorities on supporting students, we can usher in a new era of creativity and ingenuity and lay a new foundation for American greatness.”

Key initiatives in the President’s 2018 budget are below:

Creating New Education Options through School Choice

  • $1 billion increase for Title I for new Furthering Options for Children to Unlock Success (FOCUS) grants. FOCUS grants would provide supplemental awards to school districts that adopt student-centered weighted student funding formulas combined with open enrollment systems.
  • $250 million increase for the Education Innovation and Research (EIR) program for competitive awards for applicants to provide scholarships for students from low-income families to attend the private school of their parents’ choice.
  • $167 million increase for the Charter Schools Grants program to strengthen State efforts to start new charter schools or expand and replicate existing high-performing charter schools while providing up to $100 million to meet the growing demand for charter school facilities.

Maintaining Support for the Nation’s Most Vulnerable Students

  • $14.9 billion in level funding for the core Title I Grants to local education agencies (LEAs) program to support State and local efforts to ensure that more than 25 million students in high-poverty schools have access to rigorous coursework and teaching.
  • $12.7 billion to maintain the Federal investment in the IDEA formula grant programs, which help support services to the 6.8 million children with disabilities nationwide and to States in their ongoing work to design and implement program improvement efforts under the Department’s Results Driven Accountability framework.
  • $736 million for the English Language Acquisition program to implement effective language instruction educational programs designed to help English learners attain English language proficiency.

Simplifying Funding for Postsecondary Education

  • Safeguards and strengthens the Pell Grant program by level funding the discretionary appropriation and supporting year-round Pell, which will increase aid available to eligible students by $16.3 billion over 10 years. The budget also proposes the cancellation of $3.9 billion from unobligated carryover funding; this cancellation will have no effect on students and will leave the Pell program on sound footing.
  • Simplifies loan repayment for students by replacing five different income driven repayment plans with a single plan aimed at prioritizing expedited loan repayment for undergraduate borrowers.
  • Provides $808.3 million for the Federal TRIO Programs and $219 million for GEAR UP, resulting in savings of $193 million from the 2017 annualized CR level. Funding for these programs is reduced in areas that are either not supported by rigorous evidence of effectiveness or that can be supported through other resources.
  • Provides $492 million for Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Minority-Serving Institutions, and Hispanic-Serving Institutions through the Higher Education Act Titles III and V programs. Titles III and V funding are important vehicles for helping close gaps among racial and socioeconomic groups in college enrollment and degree attainment by improving these institutions’ academic programs, institutional capacity and student support services.
  • Reduces Federal Work-Study while reforming the poorly-targeted program to ensure funds go to undergraduate students who would benefit most.

Building Evidence around Educational Innovation

  • $616.8 million for the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) for continued support of State and local-based research, evaluation and statistics that help educators, policymakers and other stakeholders improve outcomes for all students.
  • $370 million for Education Innovation and Research to expand support for evidence-based initiatives to develop, validate and scale up effective education interventions that help States and LEAs meet Elementary and Secondary Education Act requirements.
  • $42 million for Supporting Effective Educator Development (SEED) to provide evidence-based professional development activities and prepare teachers and principals from nontraditional preparation and certification routes to serve in high-need LEAs.

Streamlining Existing Programs

  • Eliminates funding for Supporting Effective Instruction State grants, a reduction of $2.3 billion. The program is proposed for elimination because evidence shows the program is poorly structured to support activities that have a measurable impact on improving student outcomes and it duplicates other ESEA program funds that may be used for professional development.
  • Eliminates funding for the 21st Century Community Learning Center program, saving $1.2 billion. The program lacks strong evidence of meeting its objectives, such as improving student achievement.
  • Eliminates Striving Readers/Comprehensive Literacy Development Grants, which will save $190 million. This program has limited impact (only 5-10 State grants are expected in the final cohort) and duplicates activities that may be supported with other Federal, State, local and private funds.

Note that because the President’s budget was completed before final fiscal year 2017 appropriations action, all comparisons are to the 2017 annualized CR level.

More information on the Department of Education’s budget request can be found at https://www2.ed.gov/about/overview/budget/budget18/index.html.

Le Moyne College wins federal grant for low-income Syracuse students

WASHINGTON — Le Moyne College will be able to continue its Upward Bound program for low-income students enrolled in Syracuse schools after winning a new five-year grant from the U.S. Department of Education.

The first installment of $388,193 was approved this week, U.S. Rep. John Katko said Thursday.

Le Moyne’s Upward Bound program helps 84 Syracuse students at Corcoran, Henninger and Nottingham high schools prepare for and graduate from college. The first-generation college students go through a college prep program and six-week summer program.

Upward Bound began at Le Moyne in 1965 as one of the first 18 pilot programs in the nation. Federal aid, including a grant of $1.9 million in 2012, has helped pay for the program.

President Donald Trump this week proposed cutting $90 million from the larger program that funds Upward Bound, part of a proposed $10.6 billion budget cutback from federal education initiatives.

The president wants to use some of the savings on his top education priority, adding $400 million to expand charter schools and provide vouchers for private and religious schools.

Katko, R-Camillus, who advocated for the Le Moyne grant, and Rep. Claudia Tenney, R-New Hartford, said they will work in Congress to fully fund the Upward Bound program and the larger TRIO education initiative for those with disadvantaged backgrounds.

Last year, more than 62,000 high school students nationwide received services through Upward Bound. About 86 percent of those students went on to graduate from high school and enroll in college.

Contact Mark Weiner anytime: Email | Twitter | Facebook | 571-970-3751

SCVNews.com | State Superintendent Urges Congress to Reject …

Tom Torlakson

State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson on Tuesday urged Congress to reject President Trump’s federal education budget proposal, which includes deep cuts to teacher training, after school programs, mental health services, advanced coursework, and many other important programs.

“I give this budget an ‘F’ grade for failing public school students in California and across the nation,” said Torlakson, who leads the country’s largest public school system with more than 6.2 million total students. “We need to invest more in our public schools, not slash away at programs that help students succeed.”

Torlakson noted that the proposed Trump budget heads in a completely different direction than the California approach to education funding.

“In California, we are providing more resources to students with the greatest needs,” he said. “The proposed Trump budget takes money away from federal programs that benefit our most vulnerable students, including after school programs that engage our students, help them stay in school, and make communities safer by reducing crime.”

The President’s budget would cut federal education programs across the board and use the money to spend about $400 million to expand charter schools and vouchers for private and religious schools, and offer another $1 billion to push public schools to favor charter and private schools.

Torlakson noted that California already has nearly 1,000 public charter schools out of more than 10,000 total schools. And students and their families can use several existing methods to transfer between public schools.

In addition, California voters have resoundingly rejected school voucher proposals, which allow students to use public funding to attend private and religious schools. Voters in 2000 cast a 71 percent “No” vote on Proposition 38, which would have created a California voucher program. A similar effort, Proposition 174, received a 70 percent “No” vote in 1993.

“Vouchers are unpopular in California,” Torlakson said. “They take critical resources away from our public schools.”

The Trump budget proposes eliminating at least 22 programs nationwide. Gone, for example, would be $1.2 billion for after school programs that serve 1.6 million children, most of whom are poor, and $2.1 billion for teacher training and class-size reduction.

California, with the most public school students and schools of any state, would suffer, Torlakson said. For example, the federal cuts would decimate federally funded before-, after- and summer school programs that serve nearly 500,000 California’s students at nearly 5,000 sites statewide.

Other federal programs would suffer significant cuts, including grants to states for career and technical education, which would lose $166 million, down 15 percent compared to current funding. Basic adult literacy instruction would lose $95 million.

No money at all would go to a fund for student support and academic enrichment that help schools pay for mental health services, anti-bullying initiatives, physical education, Advanced Placement courses, and science and engineering instruction. Congress created the fund, which totals $400 million this fiscal year, by rolling together several smaller programs. The administration’s budget for it would be zero in the next fiscal year.

“We need the federal government to help support all California students as they learn on their way to success in 21st century careers and college,” Torlakson said. “This budget fails. Congress needs to send it back, correct these errors, and produce a school budget that makes our great nation proud.”

Congress is scheduled to adopt a budget that would start with the new federal fiscal year on Oct. 1, 2017.