‘We’re Begging for Education.’ Meet the Teacher Who Panhandled to Buy Her Class School Supplies

An Oklahoma teacher stood at a highway intersection panhandling for school supplies last week. She was surprised when she made $52 in 10 minutes and “overwhelmed” by the support she received online in the days that followed. But the interaction that affected her most was a young woman who approached her, donated her waitressing tips and said, “I’m alive today because of a teacher like you.”

“That just choked me up,” said Teresa Danks, a third-grade teacher at Grimes Elementary School in Tulsa, Okla., who set out to raise money for her classroom and send a message about education funding challenges that she thinks too few people understand.

Oklahoma has recently led the nation in cuts to general education funding per student, according to a report by the nonpartisan Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. Oklahoma also ranked 49th out of 50 states and the District of Columbia for average teacher salary, which was $45,276 in the state in 2016, according to a report by the National Education Association.

Danks, 50, said she typically spends $2,000 to $3,000 of her $35,000 salary on classroom supplies each year. Recent budget cuts have worsened the financial burden on teachers, who are often tasked with purchasing their own classroom supplies. Oklahoma’s budget crisis has led to larger class sizes, textbook shortages and, in some districts, a four-day school week, the Washington Post reported in May.

“It’s just getting to the point where we don’t have anything else to cut,” Danks told TIME.

She stood outside last Wednesday with a sign that read, “Teacher needs school supplies! Anything helps.” She was hoping to draw attention to her need for supplies for art and science projects — beads, pipe cleaners, pom poms, googly eyes and paper towels — and then continue raising money online.

“I mean, they sound silly, but these kinds of things are what you need — paper towel rolls, toilet paper rolls, they make the good little rocket ships when we do our solar system study,” she said. “Most of these kids will never leave the city they live in or the rural community they live in, so teachers are trying to bring the world to them.”

Deborah Gist, superintendent of Tulsa Public Schools, said state budget cuts have been “really, really difficult” for the school system.

“We certainly know — and I know personally from having been a teacher for many years — that it is unfortunately commonplace in our country for teachers to invest many hundreds of dollars or thousands of dollars in their classroom,” she said, adding that she took a second job at a pet store and later as a restaurant hostess to make money for her classroom when she was a teacher in Texas.

“We try to do what we can to make up for the lack of investment on the part of our state in our schools,” Gist continued, “and I’ll continue to advocate for that.”

After Danks’ brief panhandling stint, she posted photos of her effort on Facebook and created a GoFundMe page, which had raised $3,500 as of Monday afternoon — surpassing her $2,000 goal for her own classroom. Danks plans to continue raising money to give to other teachers in partnership with DonorsChoose.org, an organization that has raised more than $500 million to fund classroom projects for public school teachers across the country.

“I definitely am going to be pushing forward this movement,” she said. “I would love to see teachers across America standing out there with their signs, saying just that we’re begging for education.”

Grants and awards roll in for College of Education researchers

The snap judgments people make in their everyday lives can have harmful effects — particularly in the classroom where educators must make lightning-fast disciplinary decisions.

Those actions, UO education researchers say, are often made based on unconscious racial and ethnic biases. As a result, students of different backgrounds can receive disproportionate levels of discipline.

“Explicit bias involves consciously treating groups differently based on the way they look, but implicit bias is different in that it’s unconscious or automatic — we’ve got to make so many decisions in our daily lives that some of it gets put on autopilot,” said Kent McIntosh, a professor in the UO Department of Special Education and Clinical Sciences who studies positive behavior support and evidence-based interventions in schools.

McIntosh and his colleagues recently received a three-year, $1.4 million grant to work on ways of preventing implicit bias. It’s one of several large grants recently awarded to researchers in the UO’s College of Education, which has continued to draw significant funding in spite of a challenging federal research environment.

In recent months, the college has received awards from the U.S. Department of Education totaling more than $6 million, and millions of dollars in additional funding from other federal agencies, such as the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health. Other recent grants have focused on tablet-based teaching technology, team problem solving, training future Oregon science teachers, exploring early math processes and other subjects.

“If there’s a common thread to these recent grants, it’s the fact that researchers in the College of Education are addressing critical social and educational challenges with an eye toward better outcomes for students and their families,” said Leslie Leve, the college’s associate dean for research and faculty development. “This research and the accompanying evidence-based programs continue to advance the performance and progress of educational and community systems, ensuring that they provide support and services that work for all.”

Researchers such as McIntosh have long studied so-called “implicit biases” in education, but until recently little research has been focused on prevention. McIntosh and a team that includes Erik Girvan, a professor in the UO School of Law who studies how stereotypes and other biases affect decision making, are carrying out an ambitious study on preventions funded by the U.S. Department of Education.

The researchers want to develop and pilot test a teacher professional development intervention to reduce the effects of implicit bias in school discipline decision-making.

“I don’t think that teachers and administrators mean for there to be different educational or discipline outcomes for students from different backgrounds, but there is a lot of data showing really large and persistent disparities,” Girvan said. “This project is on the front end of efforts to reduce discriminatory behavior from implicit bias in the education context.”

Other recent Department of Education grants include:

  • A four-year, $3.3 million award to Mari Cary and Ben Clarke in the Center on Teaching Learning for the “Evaluation of the KinderTek iPad Math Program.” Researchers will study the effectiveness of a tablet-based math program for kindergarten students.
  • A four-year, $1.4 million grant to Erin Chaparro and the Education and Community Supports program for “PTIPS Ed Tech: Developing Professional Development and Online Applications to Support Team-Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) within Multi-Tiered Support Systems.” The project will develop online training materials and tools that will allow school teams to effectively use academic and behavioral data for decision-making.

The College of Education also secured major awards from the National Science Foundation, including:

  • A five-year, $2.5 million grant to Ben Clarke, Hank Fien and Lina Shaley in the Center on Teaching Learning to examine “Mapping Non-Response to Math Interventions.” The project will explore critical early math processes by examining behavioral and neural indicators of first grade students.
  • A five-year, $1.2 million grant to Juliet Baxter and Dean Livelybrooks in the Oregon Education Science Laboratory to look at “Experiencing Science Practices Through Research to Inspire Teaching (ESPRIT).” The collaborative project, which will partner with local school districts, aims to train 20 high-achieving students with science, technology, engineering and math majors to be science teachers in high-need schools.

David Conover, the UO’s vice president for research and innovation, credited College of Education researchers with remaining active in their pursuit of sponsored funding during a time when federal funding for education research faces an uncertain future. The Trump administration has slightly increased funding for the Institute of Education Sciences — the Education Department’s research arm — but has outlined $9 billion in proposed cuts to the U.S. Department of Education budget.

“The recent accomplishments of our faculty members in the College of Education serve as a source of inspiration,” Conover said. “Despite facing an uncertain funding environment in Washington, D.C., our researchers are continuing to secure new awards and contracts that put us on the front lines of education policy and practice.

“We thank the Oregon Congressional delegation for continuing to support the life-changing research that meets the needs of children and families nationwide.”

Cheers for July 23

Freed Hardeman
honors local trio

Three students from Etowah County made the President’s List for the Spring 2017 semester at Freed Hardeman University in Henderson, Tennessee: Abby Dickson, a junior English major from Gadsden; Jacob Dowdy, a freshman music major from Gadsden; and Claire Livingston, a freshman child and family studies major from Glencoe.

 

Snead State’s
spring graduates

Snead State Community College students from Northeast Alabama who received degrees in Spring 2017 commencement ceremonies:

ALBERTVILLE

• Courtney Elizabeth Adams, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Ashlay Allen, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Alyssa Brooke Angel, Associate in Science in General Eduaction.

• Brianna Renee Barnes, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Tabitha Boyd, Associate in Science in Public Relations.

• Maria Jesus Caballero, Associate in Applied Science in Applied Business, short-term certificate in Accounting Technology.

• Maria Guadalupe Cantellano, Associate in Science in Business.

• Madison Hope Cantrell, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Sabrina Cassels, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Jean-Pierre Emanuel Castellon, Associate in Science in Chemical Engineering.

• Natalie Beth Champion, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Lauren Nicole Chumley, Associate in Science in Business.

• Sara Railyn Coe, short-term certificate in Cybersecurity.

• Tyler Blake Collins, short-term certificate in Basic Electricity.

• Jordan Elizabeth Compton, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Marlon Joseph Cordova, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Julia Davis, Associate in Applied Science in Applied Business, short-term certificate in General Business.

• Molly Melanie Doyle, Associate in Science in Early Childhood Education.

• Kevin Duke, Associate in Applied Science in Industrial Maintenance Technology.

• Adrienne Epperson, Associate in Science in Criminal Justice.

• Anna Elizabeth Fant, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Lori Leann Fleming, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• Amber Fortner, Associate in Applied Science in Office Administration.

• Matthew Richard Fox, short-term certificate in Computer Technician.

• Kimberly Goodwin, short-term certificate in Office Administration.

• Denny Gonzalez Guzman, Associate in Science with Pre-Nursing.

• Letitia Hall, Associate in Applied Science in Applied Business.

• Danielle Leigh Havis, Associate in Applied Science in Applied Business, short-term certificate in Accounting Technology.

• Cristal Hernandez, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Jessica Hoang, Associate in Science in Biology.

• Brittney Lashay Isbell, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Eli Callahan Jones, Associate in Science in Physical Education.

• Colin Ryan Karr, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Chelsie Ann Knabel, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• Steven Christopher Lang, Associate in Science in Business.

• Mariah Jade Leach, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• Rachel Leonard, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Malari Lee Lewis, short-term certificate in Child Development.

• Maricela Luevano Medina, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Julia Faith Marshall, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Katelyn Marshall, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Kristen Brooke Martin, Associate in Science in Elementary Education.

• Armando Mendoza, Associate in Science in Psychology.

• Steve Moise, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Alona Eshaela Moore, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Amanda Joyce Moore, Associate in Science in Special Education.

• Sarah Kathryn Nichols, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Cody Lee Nix, Associate in Science in Business.

• Dienly Jean Phillipe, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• Seth Grayston Rains, Associate in Science in Mechanical Engineering.

• Ashlie Ramirez, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• Chelsea Faith Ray, Associate in Science in Early Childhood Education.

• Kevin Lee Roberson, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Anayele Rodriguez, Associate in Applied Science in Office Administration, short-term certificate in Office Administration.

• Elida Balcazar Rodriguez, Associate in Applied Science in Office Administration, short-term certificate in Office Administration.

• Monica Duran Santoyo, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Dylan Keith Shadinger, Associate in Science in Biology.

• Hannah Brooke Short, Associate in Science in Elementary Education.

• Erin Sloan, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Kaitlyn Elizabeth Smith, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Yesenia Arely Peraza Soto, Associate in Applied Science in Applied Business, short-term certificate in Accounting Technology.

• Jonathan Isai Ulloa, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Emily Nicole Wilson, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Victor Alfonso Zavala Luna, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Sarah Grace Williams, Associate in Applied Science in Child Development.

• Christopher Stone, short-term certificate in Cisco.

• Dana Marie Stidger, Associate in Science in Elementary Education.

• Laura Williamson, Associate in Science in Elementary Education.

• Joel Benjamin Walls, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• Barbara Kelly Whitman, Associate in Science in Business.

• John Louis Todd, Associate in History.

ALTOONA

• Andrew Tyler Cornelius, Associate in Science in Computer Science.

• Jesse Caitlyn Evatt, short-term certificate in Nursing Assistant.

• Timothy Justen Graul, Associate in Science in Science Education.

• Kiel Lamar Harrelson, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Douglas Tran Howard, Associate in Science in Civil Engineering.

• Gabriel Blayne Miller, Associate in Science in History.

• Bailey Andrew Morton, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Maria Guadalupe Serrano, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Haley RaChell Thompson, Associate in Science in General Education.

ATTALLA

• Courtney Morgan Childers, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Tristan Seth Delgado, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Faith Leigh Lemons, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Michael Don Maharry, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Michaela McGuire, Associate in Science in Business.

• Krystal Necole Moon, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Arianna Michelle Patterson, Associate in Applied Science in Applied Business, short-term certificate in Health Care Management.

• Amy Nasya Weeks, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Kelly Lynn White, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Brent Whitman, Associate in Science in Criminal Justice.

BOAZ

• David Joshua Adelman, Associate in Applied Science in Computer Science Technology, a short-term certificate in Cisco.

• McKenna Anderson, Associate in Science in Early Childhood Education.

• Warren Brylee Argy, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Chasity Rae Arnold, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• Dakota Shane Ballentine, Associate in Science in Business.

• Wesley Nathan Burns, Associate in Science in Mechanical Engineering.

• Sawyer Edward Cahela, Associate in Science in Business.

• Ana Calmo Matias, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Lucas Cain Cason, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Miranda Cochran, Associate in Science in Business.

• Jonathan Allen Cole, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Vicki Craig, Associate in Science in Accounting.

• Charles Cummings, Associate in Applied Science in Applied Business, short-term certificate in General Business.

• Heather Dohring, Associate in Science in Psychology.

• Matthew Stuart Duvall, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Garrett Benjamin Dyar, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Rhonda Jayonn Hagler, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Glynda Doreen Harper, Associate in Applied Science in Office Administration.

• Katherine Michelle Hays, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Mary Holcomb, Associate in Science in Biology.

• Heather Ann Jenkins, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Mira LeAnn White Johnson, Associate in Science in Business.

• Sarah Johnson, Associate in Applied Science in Office Administration, short-term certificates in Office Administration and Medical Transcription.

• Allie BreAnna Jones, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• Cassidy Hope Jones, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Emma Kate Kelley, Associate in Science in Early Childhood Education.

• Rachel Kilgo, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Cheyenne Shania Kilgore, Associate in Applied Science in Applied Business, short-term certificate in General Business.

• Ashley Nicole Kilpatrick, short-term certificate in Medical Transcription.

• Erin Lashell Kilpatrick, Associate in Science in Business.

• Ryan King, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Elijah Brodie Lathan, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Courtney Alise Lee, Associate in Science in Music.

• Christian Chad Leonard, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• David Lowenstein, Associate in Science in Psychology.

• Brett Austin Maltbie, short-term certificate in Cisco.

• Meagan Nicole Miller, Associate in Applied Science in Child Development.

• Tiffany Marie Miller, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Ryan Ashley Millwood, Associate in Applied Science in Applied Business.

• Austin Clay Minor, Associate in Science in Religious Studies.

• William Thomas Morgan, Associate in Science in Agricultural Business and Economics.

• Melissa Ann Nevinski, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Zachary Pike, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Judson Andre Proctor, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Hannah Nicole Rains, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Brandy Michelle Ross, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Abbie Grace Salers, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Kyle Andrew Sanders, Associate in Science in Electrical Engineering.

• Christian Jay Shell, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• Branden Dewayne Sims, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Austin David Smith, Associate in Science in Computer Science.

• Morgan Renee Smith, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Stephanie Leigh Smith, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Briana Hope Soworowski, short-term certificate in Medical Transcription.

• Carly Diane Stephens, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Trey William Willoughby, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Chelsea Lake Wallace, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Kelli Nicole White, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Lauren Hope Wills, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Trista West, short-term certificate in Computer Technician.

• Elijah Max Walker, Associate in Science in Social Studies Education.

COLLINSVILLE

• Makayla Spade, Associate in Science in General Education.

CROSSVILLE

• Erick Calderon, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• Jessica Morgan Clontz, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Tiffany Dalrymple, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Elias Hernandez Lopez, short-term certificate in Basic Electricity.

• Elijah Tait Holcomb, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Caleb Johnston, Associate in Science in History Education.

• Derrick Robert Jones, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Traci Maddox Norris, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Emily Ann Smith, Associate in Science in Business.

• Brady Lee Williams, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Crystal Hayes Watkins, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Maria Guadalupe Vidal, Associate in Applied Science in Applied Business, short-term certificate in General Business.

• Heather Nicole Willbanks, Associate in Applied Science, short-term certificate in Office Administration.

DOUGLAS

• Ramsey Izena Hill, Associate in Science in General Education.

FORT PAYNE

• Ethan Rickey Bethune, Associate in Science in Business.

• Ashley Nicole Norris, Associate in Science in Exercise Science and Wellness.

• Laura Leigh Parker, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

FYFFE

• Shanna Asha Hicks, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Macey Katlin Parris, Associate in Science in Electrical Engineering.

GADSDEN

• Melissa Jane Jackson Baker, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Bryna Dawn Carter, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Brandon Russell Matthews, Associate in Science in Physical Education.

• Alysha Nicole Taylor, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Michael Vaughn, short-term certificate in Basic Electricity.

GUNTERSVILLE

• Jessica Lucas Altamirano, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• Sarah Michelle Arnold, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• William Taylor Camper, Associate in Science in Business.

• Grace Ellen Carlton, Associate in Science in Psychology.

• Jennifer Clark, certificate in Child Development.

• Clayton Lee Cox, Associate in Science in Business.

• Irby Lawayne Cox, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Caitlyn Sierra Croft, Associate in Science in Speech Pathology.

• Jenna Danielle Ham, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Jeffery Delane Hamilton, Associate in Applied Science in Applied Business, short-term certificate in Logistics, Distribution and Purchasing.

• Brandy Hammons, Associate in Science in Business.

• Amanda Harden, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• Heather Harden, short-term certificate in Child Development.

• Olivia Ann Hawkins, Associate in Science in English.

• Sarah Abigail Hawkins, Associate in Science in Business.

• Wynter Joy Hilbun, Associate in Science in Religious Studies.

• Taylor Dan Hogue, Associate in Science in Chemistry Education.

• Allene McCormick Howe, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• Zacharie Tyler Hutchins, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Jordan Thomas Jarvis, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Matthew Emil Lindblad, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Amanda Marrero, Associate in Science in Human Services.

• Allie Rebekah Martin, Associate in Science in Psychology.

• Justina Anne Morrow, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Michael Regan, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Holley Ann Robinson, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Tristen Ruben Salinas, Associate in Science in Business.

• Carlee Faith Sims, Associate in Science in Elementary Education.

• Callie Christine Taylor, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Erica Jane Whitaker, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Anna Lane VanZandt, Associate in Science in Elementary Education.

• Anna Beth Watson, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• Daylah Brooke Swords, Associate in English Language Arts Education.

HOKES BLUFF

• Karina Marie Auten, Associate in Science in Business.

PIEDMONT

• Tareek Denard Spears, Associate in Science in Mechanical Engineering.

RAINSVILLE

  Erica Leigh Cameron, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Treyton Cole Gibson, Associate in Science in History Education.

SOUTHSIDE

• Kaitlin Clay Bolton, Associate in Science in Elementary Education.

 

Snead announces
President’s List

Snead State Community College has announced its President’s List for the Spring 2017 semester. To be eligible, a student must maintain a perfect grade point average of a 4.00 (all A’s) and be enrolled for 12 or more credit hours of regular college-level courses.

ALBERTVILLE

Jacob Bates, Lauren Elizabeth Beasley, Alexandra Blackstone, Dusty Earl Blakely, Ashlyn Elizabeth Bowling, Jillianna Grace Boyd, Salim Chacon, Natalie Champion, Hayley Meashell Clements, Sara Railyn Coe, Carsen Daniel, Julia Allen Davis, Molly Doyle, Matthew Richard Fox, Allie Freeman, Laura Garcia Lopez, Laura Isabel Gutierrez, Allison Hansford, Rosemary Hernandez, Destin Nicole Higginbotham, Jessica Hoang, Colton Holsonback, Florde Maria Jimenez, Eli Jones, Kayla Katherine Kean, Briar Rose Lilly, Brenda Lee Lopez-Antonio, Brittany Jordan McCool, Armando Mendoza, Gabriel Blayne Miller, Garrett Mason Moon, Patrick Joseph Nein, Caitlin Alyssa Peppers, Carley Ann Peppers, Jesse Robert Phillips, Roland Pointer, Chelsea Ray, Kevin Roberson, Jared Sampson, Dylan Shadinger, Allison Danielle Smith, Allison Nicole Soper, Ana Lizeht Soriano, Dana Stidger, Alyssa Sutton, Emily Terrell, Evelin Gonzalez Trejo, Katelynn Troup, Presley Morgan Weems, Denise Zaragoza

ALEXANDRIA

Jordan Layne Gregoria, Andrew Shaw

ALTOONA

Timothy Justen Graul, Kiel Harrelson, Karlye Michele Payne, Jacob Phillips, Jennifer Nicole Vaughn

ATTALLA

Morgan Marie Carroll, Makayla Griffith, Michaela Leanne McGuire, Amy Weeks

BOAZ

David Joshua Adelman, Warren Brylee Argy, Anna Hooper Brown, Katherine Elizabeth Burnett, Lucas Cason, Amber Lashae Colquitt, Zachary Guice, Anna Gunter, Ginny Hester, Sarah Johnson, Ashley Nicole Kilpatrick, Erin Kilpatrick, Jessica Nicole Lee, Frances Lowenstein, Bailey Dianne Maynard, Audrey Renee Miller, Zachary Dale Pike, Madison Nicole Ray, Kyle Andrew Sanders, Scott Schrandt, Morgan Smith, Eric Wilborn, Hannah Williams, Nicholas Williams, Trey William Willoughby

CROSSVILLE

Joshua Caleb Bailey, Anna Blalock, Susan Alesha Driskill, Chelsey Lynn Stevens, Maria Guadalupe Vidal, Brady Williams

GADSDEN

Matthew Banks, Brandon Matthews, Shayan Pramani, David Alan Weldon

GERALDINE

Madison Cheyanne Cofield, Damion Justin Totherow

GLENCOE

Christopher Snyder

GUNTERSVILLE

Sarah Michelle Arnold, Alyssa Katherine Bass, Cloie Hope Bridges, Johnna Riley Britt, Wesley Alan Calhoun, Zachary Clark, Megan Deborah Derums, David Doby, Abigail Grace Hotalen, Allene Howe, Ryan Aaron Howell, Kaleigh Lynn Hyde, Bryon Edward Fergus Quick, Cristy Nicole Rhodarmer, Tristen Salinas, Gurdeep Singh, Michael Wilder

LEESBURG

Sabryn Chandler

SOUTHSIDE

Jacob Coker

 

Austin selected
to Dean’s List

Derrick Charles Austin of Gadsden was recently named to the Dean’s List at Birmingham-Southern College.

To make the list, a student must have a minimum 3.6 grade point average for the semester.

Austin graduated from the school this spring with a Bachelor of Science in mathematics.

 

Higher education punished for state officials’ errors – Beckley Register

The presidents of both Bluefield State College and Concord University say it’s business as usual regarding financial aid for students, despite federal reimbursement problems created by the state.

According to a report by The Associated Press, the U.S. Department of Education confirmed that all West Virginia’s public colleges and universities will be placed on “provisional certification to be reimbursed for financial aid with heightened cash monitoring for at least five years.”

That’s because, the report says, state officials’ errors for three straight years have resulted in late federal filings, which puts sanctions on state colleges participating in its Title IV programs for federal grants and loans.

Popular Pell Grants are among the Title IV benefits.

For the past three years, the state has submitted its audit of federal dollars after the March 31 deadline.

As a result of that, rather than being reimbursed up front for the grants and loans, cash-strapped schools will have to come up with the money and be reimbursed later.

“This action by the U.S. Department of Education affects not just Bluefield State but every public four-year and two-year institution in West Virginia,” said Dr. Marcia Krotseng, president of BSC.

Krotseng said higher institutions are being “penalized for something over which we had no control.”

The department rejected a state excuse that this year’s two-month delay of a required Bluefield State College audit resulted from state agencies “not providing the data timely” that was first needed to complete an underlying financial report.

That deadline was March 31, but Krotseng also rejected the excuse, saying the information was provided to the state by the deadline.

“As Chancellor Paul Hill (Higher Education Policy Commission) has emphasized to the presidents (of state colleges and universities), all of our state’s public higher education institutions met the March 31 deadline in advance, and the final higher education portion of the audit was clean,” she said.

Regardless of the problem, Krotseng said students will receive their financial aid this year.

“I am very grateful to the Governor’s Office, the Department of Revenue, Chancellor Hill, Senator (Joe) Manchin, Senator (Shelley Moore) Capito, and Congressman (Evan) Jenkins for their immediate response and strong commitment to finding both short- and long-term solutions to this situation,” she said. “With their assistance, our students will receive their financial aid dollars next month just as expected.”

Dr. Kendra Boggess, Concord University president, also said students will receive the aid on time.

“Our first priority is always our students,” she said. “We want to make sure they understand this will not impact the status of their financial aid in regards to attending classes in the upcoming academic year.”

Boggess also ensured the faculty and staff that “university operations will continue as they always have.“

“We are communicating with both our students and employees to ease their concerns and our business office staff is available to answer any questions,” she said. “At this point, we are moving forward, as planned.”

Gov. Jim Justice said in the AP report that he will find out who’s responsible and then “heads will roll.”

— Contact Charles Boothe at cboothe@bdtonline.com

UWMC business administration students have access to UWSP’s accredited program in Wausau

As our workforce ages and as high school graduating classes decline, workforce development — “talent development” — is a major challenge in northern Wisconsin. It is a significant obstacle to economic growth.

One approach to overcoming this challenge is to align education with regional economic needs. 

A major initiative, currently underway throughout the state, is to provide students in grades six through 12 with the skills and means to explore careers and to develop their own career management and planning skills. The initiative, called Academic and Career Planning, is intended to equip students and their families with the tools necessary to make more informed choices about postsecondary education and training as it leads to careers.

When it comes to growing our own talent in this region, it helps when local institutions work together to offer programs in ways and in locations that make it convenient for students to gain the necessary training or credential they, and local employers, need. This might be all the more critical when it comes to providing opportunities for students who are already in the workforce and who wish to return to education to further their careers.

One such long-standing program is the Collaborative Degree Program in Business Administration, offered by the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point at the University of Wisconsin-Marathon County campus in Wausau.

“I wouldn’t be where I am now without the CDP,” said Dan Ehmke, a recent graduate and local business manager who grew up in Wausau and wanted to make Wausau his home. “I was able to work at my current job while taking the business classes I needed to succeed. After graduating in 2013, I am now manager at the store I worked at while in college!”

This year, the School of Business and Economics at UW-Stevens Point earned accreditation from the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business, a hallmark of excellence among business schools and a credential recognized worldwide.

One fact noted by AACSB was that UWSP faculty members teach in the Business Administration Collaborative Degree Program at UWMC. Students can be assured there are no compromises on quality in the Wausau program.

RELATED:UWSP chancellor: Accreditation great for students, employers

The degree is open to all students, but those who already hold jobs or who perhaps have family obligations will find the local classes especially convenient. And students who prefer “live” instructors will not be disappointed.

Amy Plier, who graduated this year, recognized the program’s qualities and was not disappointed: “As a nontraditional student raising a family, the CDP program gave me the opportunity to obtain a University of Wisconsin  education and four-year business administration degree right here in Wausau,” she said

“Evening business classes are taught face-to-face by UW-Stevens Point professors at the UW-Marathon County campus, providing a learning environment and schedule that is conducive to working students. While other universities may tout seemingly comparable in-person or online business administration programs, the CDP program offers students a reputable and affordable UW education – which is highly desirable to prospective employers.”

As with all UW degrees, there is a general education component that includes prerequisites for upper-level courses. These “gen ed” courses, as well as courses in the major, can be taken at UWMC. If you already hold a degree or have an incomplete degree, credit often can be granted for courses already taken, including some credit from technical colleges. A business administration degree is a qualification employers are looking for.

If you are interested in this program or to learn more about our fall semester collaborative degree offerings, you can attend an information reception from 5 to 5:45 p.m. Aug. 9 at UW-Marathon County. Please call 715-261-6100 to register.

Keith Montgomery is the regional executive officer and dean of UW Colleges North.

What do we have to lose with federal education cuts?

What do you have to lose?

President Trump asked neglected voters the same question at least 100 times down the stretch of the 2016 campaign.

“Our government has totally failed our African American friends, our Hispanic friends and the people of our country. Period,” Trump said at one campaign stop. “The Democrats have failed completely in the inner cities. For those hurting the most who have been failed and failed by their politician — year after year, failure after failure, worse numbers after worse numbers. Poverty. Rejection. Horrible education. No housing, no homes, no ownership. Crime at levels that nobody has seen.

“You can go to war zones in countries that we are fighting and it’s safer than living in some of our inner cities that are run by the Democrats. And I ask you this, I ask you this — crime, all of the problems — to the African Americans, who I employ so many, so many people, to the Hispanics, tremendous people: What the hell do you have to lose? Give me a chance. I’ll straighten it out. I’ll straighten it out. What do you have to lose?”

Pretty effective rhetoric from an outsider who was promising to drain the swamp. In swing states such as Ohio, Pennsylvania and Michigan, it made a difference.

Now, six months later, we’re finding out the remedy from Trump.

Part of the Republican’s solution for what ails working-class Americans includes deep federal education cuts across the board — $9 billion, in fact, to programs that impact student achievement, graduation rates, college affordability and workforce readiness.

What do you have to lose?

If those massive cuts go into effect, southern Middle Tennessee will see devastating consequences and setbacks. We need job training and education in Tennessee to attract companies and investment. Job growth does not happen with an uneducated and untrained workforce. It cannot happen without federal dollars for investment.

The Committee for Education Funding pointed out the severity of Trump’s proposed budget cuts in a briefing last week on Capitol Hill in Washington.

One participant was Jan McKeel, executive director of South Central Tennessee Workforce Alliance. She serves suburban and rural clientele from Spring Hill to Waynesboro who would lose with Trump’s proposed cuts.

“Our goal is to provide the same high-quality adult education and workforce services to all areas – rural, suburban and urban – and that can’t happen when federal support is drastically cut,” McKeel said. “We’ve already seen funding cuts, and witnessed the erosion of our workforce development infrastructure, particularly in the more rural areas. The president’s budget would make it much harder to serve the 250,000 people in the many counties we cover.”

The long list of cuts, as illustrated by the Committee for Education Funding, was breathless. They would reduce appropriations for preschoolers, students in elementary school, children who use after-school programs, high schoolers seeking preparation for the workforce, adult learners, teachers and school leaders, schools and institutions, and low-income Americans who rely on federal aid to go to college.

What do you have to lose?

The proposed budget also eliminates funding for education-related services, including libraries and museums, and cuts student loans by $143 billion over 10 years, the committee’s report said.

“Investing in education pays dividends immediately and in the long term. To keep America strong and prepared to compete in the global economy, we should be increasing – not cutting – the federal investment in education,” Committee for Education Funding Executive Director Sheryl Cohen said.

What do you have to lose?

“Investments in education currently account for only 2 percent of the federal budget, and the President’s request reduces the share even further as part of a deep, multi-year cut in non-defense discretionary funding,” said Committee for Education Funding President Jocelyn Bissonnette, director of government affairs for the National Association of Federally Impacted Schools. “Drastic cuts to federal education investments will reduce opportunities for students across the education spectrum, impacting student achievement, graduation rates, college affordability, and workforce readiness.”

In rural cities and towns, federal dollars make the difference in providing specialized help for students and their families. With the average family in southern Middle Tennessee, federal financial aid makes the difference in going to college. Tennessee Promise only pays for two years of tuition.

“The budget would impose devastating cuts to important federal financial aid programs that allow low-income students to attend college and attain their degrees,” said Heather Boutell, director of financial aid at Bellarmine University, Louisville.

What do you have to lose?

The stakes have grown too high in Tennessee to accept such deep cuts. It took generations for the legislature to understand the nasty consequences of poor education. The vicious cycle of poverty has only one cure — better education.

Every time a dropout attains a high school diploma in Tennessee, for example, it represents a $10,000 a year increase in disposable income.

“Edcuation is economic development,” McKeel said. “I understand priorities and making tough choices. I’m just concerned that local governments will be forced to make up for these education cuts, and that’s impossible in our region.”

With the state going in the right direction, with low unemployment, we can’t stand for the federal budget to derail momentum.

Straighten out the budget, Mr. President. Continue invest in the future, even at flat levels, not hack away at its foundation.

What do we have to lose?

Far too much.

◆◆◆

James Bennett is editor of The Daily Herald. He was aTennessee Press Association first-place award winner for editorial writing and public service in 2016. Contact him at jbennett@c-dh.net.

Raleigh General improving new RN orientation process – Beckley Register

To help improve turnover rates and better prepare new registered nurses for the demands of the job, Raleigh General Hospital is upping the ante during initial training. 

Teresa Thacker, executive director of Medical Surgical Services, said the regular eight-week orientation is being increased to 16 weeks, including a weekly four-hour educational course in which the nurses will learn directly from the best in the field. 

Twenty-five registered nurses, some of whom have experience as licensed practical nurses, others who were hired directly out of school, are currently taking part in the training. They will begin patient rotation in the upcoming months, and will be ready to assume their full duties in November. 

“We felt that the new graduate nurses, fresh from school, could use additional support in learning some of the processes they need every day to take care of patients,” Thacker shared. 

The orientation program previously was the same for brand new nurses or nurses who had 10 years experience. 

“We brought you in the same, educated you the same, then put you to work,” Thacker said. “Finally, we got to the point we realized it wasn’t working well.” 

She said nursing programs give students the knowledge they need for the job, but actually being in a hospital setting tending to patients requires additional skills. 

“We’re putting more effort into the upfront process.”

During the educational sessions, nurses will learn from the experts in their fields, such as the lab director and the cardio-pulmonary director. The directors will help teach the new nurses the importance of each aspect of their jobs. They’ll also learn, hands-on, how to use certain equipment at the hospital before they ever touch a patient. 

“The quality of care that the nurses will be providing to patients will improve,” Thacker said. “They’re going to understand why they need to give faster, standardized care.” 

Not only will nurses learn technical skills, but they will also learn more about the personal and social skills needed for the job. Thacker said some of the topics will include professionalism at the bedside and how to have critical conversations. 

Social skills education hasn’t been provided in the past, Thacker said, but she believes it will greatly improve the nurses’ confidence level as they begin working directly with patients. 

“We want to set ourselves aside. We want to show that we see the value in investing in this employee. We’ve always seen the value, but we believe we can do it better.” 

Thacker is hopeful new employees will enjoy the orientation experience and tell their peers Raleigh General is a great place to start. 

She said most of the 25 new nurses hired will be filling vacancies. Others will be entering newly created positions, as the hospital’s service line is expanding.  

— Email: wholdren@register-herald.com and follow on Twitter @WendyHoldren

Cheers for July 23 – News – The Times – Apalachicola, FL

Freed Hardeman
honors local trio

Three students from Etowah County made the President’s List for the Spring 2017 semester at Freed Hardeman University in Henderson, Tennessee: Abby Dickson, a junior English major from Gadsden; Jacob Dowdy, a freshman music major from Gadsden; and Claire Livingston, a freshman child and family studies major from Glencoe.

 

Snead State’s
spring graduates

Snead State Community College students from Northeast Alabama who received degrees in Spring 2017 commencement ceremonies:

ALBERTVILLE

• Courtney Elizabeth Adams, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Ashlay Allen, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Alyssa Brooke Angel, Associate in Science in General Eduaction.

• Brianna Renee Barnes, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Tabitha Boyd, Associate in Science in Public Relations.

• Maria Jesus Caballero, Associate in Applied Science in Applied Business, short-term certificate in Accounting Technology.

• Maria Guadalupe Cantellano, Associate in Science in Business.

• Madison Hope Cantrell, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Sabrina Cassels, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Jean-Pierre Emanuel Castellon, Associate in Science in Chemical Engineering.

• Natalie Beth Champion, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Lauren Nicole Chumley, Associate in Science in Business.

• Sara Railyn Coe, short-term certificate in Cybersecurity.

• Tyler Blake Collins, short-term certificate in Basic Electricity.

• Jordan Elizabeth Compton, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Marlon Joseph Cordova, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Julia Davis, Associate in Applied Science in Applied Business, short-term certificate in General Business.

• Molly Melanie Doyle, Associate in Science in Early Childhood Education.

• Kevin Duke, Associate in Applied Science in Industrial Maintenance Technology.

• Adrienne Epperson, Associate in Science in Criminal Justice.

• Anna Elizabeth Fant, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Lori Leann Fleming, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• Amber Fortner, Associate in Applied Science in Office Administration.

• Matthew Richard Fox, short-term certificate in Computer Technician.

• Kimberly Goodwin, short-term certificate in Office Administration.

• Denny Gonzalez Guzman, Associate in Science with Pre-Nursing.

• Letitia Hall, Associate in Applied Science in Applied Business.

• Danielle Leigh Havis, Associate in Applied Science in Applied Business, short-term certificate in Accounting Technology.

• Cristal Hernandez, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Jessica Hoang, Associate in Science in Biology.

• Brittney Lashay Isbell, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Eli Callahan Jones, Associate in Science in Physical Education.

• Colin Ryan Karr, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Chelsie Ann Knabel, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• Steven Christopher Lang, Associate in Science in Business.

• Mariah Jade Leach, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• Rachel Leonard, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Malari Lee Lewis, short-term certificate in Child Development.

• Maricela Luevano Medina, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Julia Faith Marshall, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Katelyn Marshall, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Kristen Brooke Martin, Associate in Science in Elementary Education.

• Armando Mendoza, Associate in Science in Psychology.

• Steve Moise, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Alona Eshaela Moore, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Amanda Joyce Moore, Associate in Science in Special Education.

• Sarah Kathryn Nichols, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Cody Lee Nix, Associate in Science in Business.

• Dienly Jean Phillipe, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• Seth Grayston Rains, Associate in Science in Mechanical Engineering.

• Ashlie Ramirez, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• Chelsea Faith Ray, Associate in Science in Early Childhood Education.

• Kevin Lee Roberson, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Anayele Rodriguez, Associate in Applied Science in Office Administration, short-term certificate in Office Administration.

• Elida Balcazar Rodriguez, Associate in Applied Science in Office Administration, short-term certificate in Office Administration.

• Monica Duran Santoyo, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Dylan Keith Shadinger, Associate in Science in Biology.

• Hannah Brooke Short, Associate in Science in Elementary Education.

• Erin Sloan, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Kaitlyn Elizabeth Smith, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Yesenia Arely Peraza Soto, Associate in Applied Science in Applied Business, short-term certificate in Accounting Technology.

• Jonathan Isai Ulloa, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Emily Nicole Wilson, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Victor Alfonso Zavala Luna, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Sarah Grace Williams, Associate in Applied Science in Child Development.

• Christopher Stone, short-term certificate in Cisco.

• Dana Marie Stidger, Associate in Science in Elementary Education.

• Laura Williamson, Associate in Science in Elementary Education.

• Joel Benjamin Walls, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• Barbara Kelly Whitman, Associate in Science in Business.

• John Louis Todd, Associate in History.

ALTOONA

• Andrew Tyler Cornelius, Associate in Science in Computer Science.

• Jesse Caitlyn Evatt, short-term certificate in Nursing Assistant.

• Timothy Justen Graul, Associate in Science in Science Education.

• Kiel Lamar Harrelson, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Douglas Tran Howard, Associate in Science in Civil Engineering.

• Gabriel Blayne Miller, Associate in Science in History.

• Bailey Andrew Morton, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Maria Guadalupe Serrano, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Haley RaChell Thompson, Associate in Science in General Education.

ATTALLA

• Courtney Morgan Childers, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Tristan Seth Delgado, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Faith Leigh Lemons, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Michael Don Maharry, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Michaela McGuire, Associate in Science in Business.

• Krystal Necole Moon, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Arianna Michelle Patterson, Associate in Applied Science in Applied Business, short-term certificate in Health Care Management.

• Amy Nasya Weeks, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Kelly Lynn White, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Brent Whitman, Associate in Science in Criminal Justice.

BOAZ

• David Joshua Adelman, Associate in Applied Science in Computer Science Technology, a short-term certificate in Cisco.

• McKenna Anderson, Associate in Science in Early Childhood Education.

• Warren Brylee Argy, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Chasity Rae Arnold, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• Dakota Shane Ballentine, Associate in Science in Business.

• Wesley Nathan Burns, Associate in Science in Mechanical Engineering.

• Sawyer Edward Cahela, Associate in Science in Business.

• Ana Calmo Matias, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Lucas Cain Cason, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Miranda Cochran, Associate in Science in Business.

• Jonathan Allen Cole, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Vicki Craig, Associate in Science in Accounting.

• Charles Cummings, Associate in Applied Science in Applied Business, short-term certificate in General Business.

• Heather Dohring, Associate in Science in Psychology.

• Matthew Stuart Duvall, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Garrett Benjamin Dyar, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Rhonda Jayonn Hagler, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Glynda Doreen Harper, Associate in Applied Science in Office Administration.

• Katherine Michelle Hays, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Mary Holcomb, Associate in Science in Biology.

• Heather Ann Jenkins, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Mira LeAnn White Johnson, Associate in Science in Business.

• Sarah Johnson, Associate in Applied Science in Office Administration, short-term certificates in Office Administration and Medical Transcription.

• Allie BreAnna Jones, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• Cassidy Hope Jones, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Emma Kate Kelley, Associate in Science in Early Childhood Education.

• Rachel Kilgo, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Cheyenne Shania Kilgore, Associate in Applied Science in Applied Business, short-term certificate in General Business.

• Ashley Nicole Kilpatrick, short-term certificate in Medical Transcription.

• Erin Lashell Kilpatrick, Associate in Science in Business.

• Ryan King, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Elijah Brodie Lathan, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Courtney Alise Lee, Associate in Science in Music.

• Christian Chad Leonard, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• David Lowenstein, Associate in Science in Psychology.

• Brett Austin Maltbie, short-term certificate in Cisco.

• Meagan Nicole Miller, Associate in Applied Science in Child Development.

• Tiffany Marie Miller, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Ryan Ashley Millwood, Associate in Applied Science in Applied Business.

• Austin Clay Minor, Associate in Science in Religious Studies.

• William Thomas Morgan, Associate in Science in Agricultural Business and Economics.

• Melissa Ann Nevinski, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Zachary Pike, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Judson Andre Proctor, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Hannah Nicole Rains, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Brandy Michelle Ross, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Abbie Grace Salers, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Kyle Andrew Sanders, Associate in Science in Electrical Engineering.

• Christian Jay Shell, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• Branden Dewayne Sims, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Austin David Smith, Associate in Science in Computer Science.

• Morgan Renee Smith, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Stephanie Leigh Smith, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Briana Hope Soworowski, short-term certificate in Medical Transcription.

• Carly Diane Stephens, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Trey William Willoughby, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Chelsea Lake Wallace, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Kelli Nicole White, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Lauren Hope Wills, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Trista West, short-term certificate in Computer Technician.

• Elijah Max Walker, Associate in Science in Social Studies Education.

COLLINSVILLE

• Makayla Spade, Associate in Science in General Education.

CROSSVILLE

• Erick Calderon, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• Jessica Morgan Clontz, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Tiffany Dalrymple, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Elias Hernandez Lopez, short-term certificate in Basic Electricity.

• Elijah Tait Holcomb, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Caleb Johnston, Associate in Science in History Education.

• Derrick Robert Jones, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Traci Maddox Norris, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Emily Ann Smith, Associate in Science in Business.

• Brady Lee Williams, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Crystal Hayes Watkins, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Maria Guadalupe Vidal, Associate in Applied Science in Applied Business, short-term certificate in General Business.

• Heather Nicole Willbanks, Associate in Applied Science, short-term certificate in Office Administration.

DOUGLAS

• Ramsey Izena Hill, Associate in Science in General Education.

FORT PAYNE

• Ethan Rickey Bethune, Associate in Science in Business.

• Ashley Nicole Norris, Associate in Science in Exercise Science and Wellness.

• Laura Leigh Parker, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

FYFFE

• Shanna Asha Hicks, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Macey Katlin Parris, Associate in Science in Electrical Engineering.

GADSDEN

• Melissa Jane Jackson Baker, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Bryna Dawn Carter, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Brandon Russell Matthews, Associate in Science in Physical Education.

• Alysha Nicole Taylor, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Michael Vaughn, short-term certificate in Basic Electricity.

GUNTERSVILLE

• Jessica Lucas Altamirano, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• Sarah Michelle Arnold, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• William Taylor Camper, Associate in Science in Business.

• Grace Ellen Carlton, Associate in Science in Psychology.

• Jennifer Clark, certificate in Child Development.

• Clayton Lee Cox, Associate in Science in Business.

• Irby Lawayne Cox, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Caitlyn Sierra Croft, Associate in Science in Speech Pathology.

• Jenna Danielle Ham, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Jeffery Delane Hamilton, Associate in Applied Science in Applied Business, short-term certificate in Logistics, Distribution and Purchasing.

• Brandy Hammons, Associate in Science in Business.

• Amanda Harden, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• Heather Harden, short-term certificate in Child Development.

• Olivia Ann Hawkins, Associate in Science in English.

• Sarah Abigail Hawkins, Associate in Science in Business.

• Wynter Joy Hilbun, Associate in Science in Religious Studies.

• Taylor Dan Hogue, Associate in Science in Chemistry Education.

• Allene McCormick Howe, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• Zacharie Tyler Hutchins, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Jordan Thomas Jarvis, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Matthew Emil Lindblad, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Amanda Marrero, Associate in Science in Human Services.

• Allie Rebekah Martin, Associate in Science in Psychology.

• Justina Anne Morrow, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Michael Regan, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Holley Ann Robinson, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Tristen Ruben Salinas, Associate in Science in Business.

• Carlee Faith Sims, Associate in Science in Elementary Education.

• Callie Christine Taylor, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Erica Jane Whitaker, Associate in Applied Science in Registered Nursing.

• Anna Lane VanZandt, Associate in Science in Elementary Education.

• Anna Beth Watson, Associate in Science in Pre-Nursing.

• Daylah Brooke Swords, Associate in English Language Arts Education.

HOKES BLUFF

• Karina Marie Auten, Associate in Science in Business.

PIEDMONT

• Tareek Denard Spears, Associate in Science in Mechanical Engineering.

RAINSVILLE

  Erica Leigh Cameron, Associate in Science in General Education.

• Treyton Cole Gibson, Associate in Science in History Education.

SOUTHSIDE

• Kaitlin Clay Bolton, Associate in Science in Elementary Education.

 

Snead announces
President’s List

Snead State Community College has announced its President’s List for the Spring 2017 semester. To be eligible, a student must maintain a perfect grade point average of a 4.00 (all A’s) and be enrolled for 12 or more credit hours of regular college-level courses.

ALBERTVILLE

Jacob Bates, Lauren Elizabeth Beasley, Alexandra Blackstone, Dusty Earl Blakely, Ashlyn Elizabeth Bowling, Jillianna Grace Boyd, Salim Chacon, Natalie Champion, Hayley Meashell Clements, Sara Railyn Coe, Carsen Daniel, Julia Allen Davis, Molly Doyle, Matthew Richard Fox, Allie Freeman, Laura Garcia Lopez, Laura Isabel Gutierrez, Allison Hansford, Rosemary Hernandez, Destin Nicole Higginbotham, Jessica Hoang, Colton Holsonback, Florde Maria Jimenez, Eli Jones, Kayla Katherine Kean, Briar Rose Lilly, Brenda Lee Lopez-Antonio, Brittany Jordan McCool, Armando Mendoza, Gabriel Blayne Miller, Garrett Mason Moon, Patrick Joseph Nein, Caitlin Alyssa Peppers, Carley Ann Peppers, Jesse Robert Phillips, Roland Pointer, Chelsea Ray, Kevin Roberson, Jared Sampson, Dylan Shadinger, Allison Danielle Smith, Allison Nicole Soper, Ana Lizeht Soriano, Dana Stidger, Alyssa Sutton, Emily Terrell, Evelin Gonzalez Trejo, Katelynn Troup, Presley Morgan Weems, Denise Zaragoza

ALEXANDRIA

Jordan Layne Gregoria, Andrew Shaw

ALTOONA

Timothy Justen Graul, Kiel Harrelson, Karlye Michele Payne, Jacob Phillips, Jennifer Nicole Vaughn

ATTALLA

Morgan Marie Carroll, Makayla Griffith, Michaela Leanne McGuire, Amy Weeks

BOAZ

David Joshua Adelman, Warren Brylee Argy, Anna Hooper Brown, Katherine Elizabeth Burnett, Lucas Cason, Amber Lashae Colquitt, Zachary Guice, Anna Gunter, Ginny Hester, Sarah Johnson, Ashley Nicole Kilpatrick, Erin Kilpatrick, Jessica Nicole Lee, Frances Lowenstein, Bailey Dianne Maynard, Audrey Renee Miller, Zachary Dale Pike, Madison Nicole Ray, Kyle Andrew Sanders, Scott Schrandt, Morgan Smith, Eric Wilborn, Hannah Williams, Nicholas Williams, Trey William Willoughby

CROSSVILLE

Joshua Caleb Bailey, Anna Blalock, Susan Alesha Driskill, Chelsey Lynn Stevens, Maria Guadalupe Vidal, Brady Williams

GADSDEN

Matthew Banks, Brandon Matthews, Shayan Pramani, David Alan Weldon

GERALDINE

Madison Cheyanne Cofield, Damion Justin Totherow

GLENCOE

Christopher Snyder

GUNTERSVILLE

Sarah Michelle Arnold, Alyssa Katherine Bass, Cloie Hope Bridges, Johnna Riley Britt, Wesley Alan Calhoun, Zachary Clark, Megan Deborah Derums, David Doby, Abigail Grace Hotalen, Allene Howe, Ryan Aaron Howell, Kaleigh Lynn Hyde, Bryon Edward Fergus Quick, Cristy Nicole Rhodarmer, Tristen Salinas, Gurdeep Singh, Michael Wilder

LEESBURG

Sabryn Chandler

SOUTHSIDE

Jacob Coker

 

Austin selected
to Dean’s List

Derrick Charles Austin of Gadsden was recently named to the Dean’s List at Birmingham-Southern College.

To make the list, a student must have a minimum 3.6 grade point average for the semester.

Austin graduated from the school this spring with a Bachelor of Science in mathematics.

 

$70000 coming to San Bernardino elementary school to aid recovery after fatal shooting – Press

SAN BERNARDINO North Park Elementary School is getting nearly $70,000 from federal education officials.

The grant is to help the school recover from the shooting in April that left a teacher and an 8-year-old student dead.

“We thank Congressman Pete Aguilar and our federal government for supporting the needs of the San Bernardino community,” San Bernardino City Unified School District Superintendent Dale Marsden said in a news release. “As we prepare for a new school year, the generous grant will help us restore a positive learning environment at North Park Elementary School.”

SBCUSD was awarded the $69,651 grant from the Department of Education, Rep. Pete Aguilar, D-San Bernardino, announced Tuesday in a news release.

. Photos: San Bernardino school shooting leaves three dead, one wounded

Aguilar wrote a letter of support for the federal grant in June on behalf of the school district. The grant will come through the project School Emergency Response to Violence Grant Program.

The grant money will be used to reimburse administrative costs and services to support the recovery process at North Park. Some of the reimbursements include funds for ongoing counseling services, substitute teachers for affected staff, and services from the immediate response to the shooting.

The April 10 shooting claimed the life of longtime educator Karen Smith and one of her special needs students, Jonathan Martinez. Smith’s estranged husband, Cedric Anderson, 53, of Riverside, walked into her classroom and opened fire before killing himself. A second student, Nolan Brandy, was wounded.

“The horrific and senseless act of violence that took the lives of Karen and Jonathan devastated our community, and none more so than their families and North Park Elementary, which includes more than 500 students and nearly 50 faculty,” Aguilar said in the statement. “Sadly, our community is no stranger to tragedy, and in the aftermath of such extraordinary emergencies, it’s critical that we have the resources available to help those affected by the violence to recover and heal.

ISU empowers students to be their best, do well in life

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